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Author Topic: This is quite amusing..  (Read 15662 times)

FredBGG

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #40 on: April 15, 2013, 08:28:43 PM »

This raises an interesting point.  Does anyone reverse or flip their photo in PS to do something similar?

When shooting for editorial I will often finalize a left and right page option.
I also like to check photos flipped (mirror image) just in case they are used that way.
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Rob C

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #41 on: April 16, 2013, 03:57:17 AM »

This raises an interesting point.  Does anyone reverse or flip their photo in PS to do something similar?


I used to use a Rollei TLR for some years. One thing I discovered was that pictures do not always translate well if reversed. That doesn't mean they are bad, simply that the dynamic flows contra-instinctively and effs the idea. There wasn't a problem with shots of a model in the middle of a paper background, but only sometimes where the whole area contributed to the sense of the picture.

Shots that do switch quite well are silhouettes.

Rob C
« Last Edit: April 16, 2013, 09:37:00 AM by Rob C »
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KLaban

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #42 on: April 16, 2013, 08:17:35 AM »

This raises an interesting point.  Does anyone reverse or flip their photo in PS to do something similar?

Not in PS, but as far as prints are concerned, yes, I often make use of a mirror.
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gerald.d

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #43 on: April 18, 2013, 11:27:58 PM »

I hope Phase One do work on an Android version.

Google Glass would nail pretty much iPad related challenge mentioned here.

In fact, I wonder how long it will be before someone comes out with software to use Glass as an EVF for a remote camera? Camera control on the phone, EVF and review on Glass.
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Marlyn

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #44 on: April 19, 2013, 12:58:53 AM »

I got a laugh out of this one!

http://youtu.be/bqnS9MpOlr8

I watched this video hoping to see the wifi working as it is a really interesting feature, but you don't actually see it in action,
but the video is a real laugh.

The discription is a good start:
The part about being able to see the image upside down to see if the composition is good.....

Also pretending that you can actually see something useful on an ipad out in direct light.....

Not to mention very limited battery life in cold temperatures, as well as the thing just packing up till it's warmed up again.

I think the only real analogy with using an 8x10 and an ipad/MFDB is that you need to go under a black cape to see the image
usefully.

Even in the video that is partly overcast you can barely see the image on the ipad.

You've got to love these marketing videos.... ;)

His pictures are beautiful though...


Troll post  #931.

Don't feed the beast.


Time to use the other forums for MF photography discussion that aren't drowning in this continuous stream of verbal diarrhea from the OP.
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Rob C

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #45 on: April 19, 2013, 03:21:23 AM »


Troll post  #931.

Don't feed the beast.


Time to use the other forums for MF photography discussion that aren't drowning in this continuous stream of verbal diarrhea from the OP.


I know it's all a load of crap, but why do the US crap-specialists write diarrhea where the civilized world has it as diarrhoea? I understand it's only a little oh, but these things make a big difference, as anyone once inflicted with the problem will readily understand.

I had imagined that the use of ancient Latin/Greek was supposed to eliminate confusion, but I suppose that confusion between said condition and gastric flue is too esoteric to admit investigation, never mind the misuse of the dead(ish) lingos.

What a quandry for me to face so early in the morning; I think I shall reconfigure my daily schedule: get up in the evening and go to bed at mid-day. I could become an astro-photographic-specialist or even a stalker of locked cemeteries. But at any rate, I would then be able to face LuLa on a full stomach!

Rob C

Bryan Conner

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #46 on: April 19, 2013, 06:40:18 AM »


I know it's all a load of crap, but why do the US crap-specialists write diarrhea where the civilized world has it as diarrhoea? I understand it's only a little oh, but these things make a big difference, as anyone once inflicted with the problem will readily understand.

I had imagined that the use of ancient Latin/Greek was supposed to eliminate confusion, but I suppose that confusion between said condition and gastric flue is too esoteric to admit investigation, never mind the misuse of the dead(ish) lingos.

What a quandry for me to face so early in the morning; I think I shall reconfigure my daily schedule: get up in the evening and go to bed at mid-day. I could become an astro-photographic-specialist or even a stalker of locked cemeteries. But at any rate, I would then be able to face LuLa on a full stomach!

Rob C

One is correct in British English and the other is correct in American English.  So, both are correct in English.  Ass you well know, there are many differences in both...butt, we can all get along on this topic.  Or, to make things more simple, we could use the term that is commonly used in some rural areas in the Southern United States (Mississippi for example):  "The back-door trots".  This can mean that the inflicted person has to trot for the back door to go to the outhouse, or that you are "running" out your own "back door".  Or, you can shorten it down to simply "the runs".  There also is "the squirts".

The German word for this condition is "Durchfall"  which means literally "to fall through".  I think it describes the situation pretty well too.

I would contribute more to this thread, but I have to run.  ;D
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MrSmith

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #47 on: April 19, 2013, 07:14:20 AM »

One is correct in British English and the other is correct in American English.  So, both are correct in English. 

No. Only one is correct in English, any other parochial affectation/deviation is not proper English and merely an abuse of borrowed language.   ;D
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Bryan Conner

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #48 on: April 19, 2013, 07:35:27 AM »

No. Only one is correct in English, any other parochial affectation/deviation is not proper English and merely an abuse of borrowed language.   ;D

You have it all wrong!  American English is a modern, improved, and updated version of British English.  ;D

http://www.online-literature.com/donne/3276/  is a piece that Mark Twain wrote explaining the differences.
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Rob C

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #49 on: April 19, 2013, 08:59:47 AM »

You have it all wrong!  American English is a modern, improved, and updated version of British English.  ;D

http://www.online-literature.com/donne/3276/  is a piece that Mark Twain wrote explaining the differences.




With respect, what would he have known?

;-)

Rob C

Bryan Conner

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #50 on: April 19, 2013, 09:12:40 AM »




With respect, what would he have known?

;-)

Rob C

Actually, quite a lot at the time.  Twain lived in Europe for many years.
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JoeKitchen

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #51 on: April 19, 2013, 01:17:56 PM »

We all have Webster to thank for this difference in the two types of English.  Shortly after the Revolutionary War (or the War for American Independence, as you Brits call it) Daniel Webster felt for us to be truly free from England's rule, we needed to create our own language.  Knowing that it would be impossible for us to completely change languages, he removed a lot of the "useless" letters in the spelling of words, for instance the "u" in colour to make into color.  He also reversed the french influence of "re" to "er," like theatre to theater.  There are also a bunch of little things too, like replacing "i" sounding Ys to Is (tyre becomes tire). 

Most people of the time thought Webster as being nuts, but he was very good at selling his idea to schools and libraries.  So a generation later American English took hold. 
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Joe Kitchen
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MrSmith

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #52 on: April 19, 2013, 01:36:23 PM »

Actually, quite a lot at the time.  Twain lived in Europe for many years.

And his opinion on proper English and Americanised English is no longer relevant, it's more a historical comment on the English class system of that time.
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Rob C

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #53 on: April 19, 2013, 02:38:02 PM »

Actually, quite a lot at the time.  Twain lived in Europe for many years.


I've lived in Spain for 32... I wouldn't even dream of thinking myself that au fait with the idiom even though I can battle along most of the time. As a 'foreigner' you always miss things. Hell, the Brits find one another difficult and there aren't even real geographical borders.

;-)

Rob C

Rob C

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #54 on: April 19, 2013, 02:55:21 PM »

We all have Webster to thank for this difference in the two types of English.  Shortly after the Revolutionary War (or the War for American Independence, as you Brits call it) Daniel Webster felt for us to be truly free from England's rule, we needed to create our own language.  Knowing that it would be impossible for us to completely change languages, he removed a lot of the "useless" letters in the spelling of words, for instance the "u" in colour to make into color.  He also reversed the french influence of "re" to "er," like theatre to theater.  There are also a bunch of little things too, like replacing "i" sounding Ys to Is (tyre becomes tire). 

Most people of the time thought Webster as being nuts, but he was very good at selling his idea to schools and libraries.  So a generation later American English took hold. 


I didn’t know that. How sad, though, to feel obliged to destroy a language in order to mark a feeling of self. On the other hand, perhaps he just couldn’t spell, either. But if he could, then another fine, if early example of the transatlantic genius in marketing. You don’t need the product, but it sure makes you feel good when others buy it!

Perhaps the vandalism was all to do with legacy: our own dear Mr Blair still searches for his… a few years after office and hardly anybody remembers him.

I look upon the Cajuns with a new respect! Not only did they bring us good swamp pop rock, they survived language fascism!

;-)

Rob C

Bryan Conner

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #55 on: April 19, 2013, 05:01:46 PM »

And his opinion on proper English and Americanised English is no longer relevant, it's more a historical comment on the English class system of that time.


Proper English?  There is not a version of English named proper English.
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MrSmith

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #56 on: April 19, 2013, 05:18:23 PM »

There is if you are English, it's a common English phrase.
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Gigi

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #57 on: April 19, 2013, 08:00:20 PM »

nice to know the common is proper in Merry England.
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Geoff

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #58 on: April 20, 2013, 01:40:32 PM »

a hah!   ;D

So glad this thread could eventually find a way to fit its title.
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FredBGG

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Re: This is quite amusing..
« Reply #59 on: April 21, 2013, 05:17:38 PM »

Time to use the other forums for MF photography discussion that aren't drowning in this continuous stream of verbal diarrhea from the OP.

When did typed out text become verbal?

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