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Author Topic: comparing digitally simulated "grain" and real scanned film's silver crystals  (Read 15855 times)

John Cothron

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You can't see real grain from  a V750 (or similar scanners) But you can see it(as i have mentioned before) from Hasselblad -Imacon scanners or even from a  Nikon Super Coolscan 9000 ED scanner. And you do not need to apply any sharpen .This is possible because of the excellent optical systems and sensors that use those scanners . Of course you can see the grain ,even better maybe , from  "real drum" scanners. To make an accurate comparison of the grain (digital vs analogue) one needs to compare digital prints from the scanned negative and analogue prints from that negative at high magnifications(40x50 cm for example).I am sorry for my possible mistakes in English. :)

Yes, I understand that now.  I have seen film grain under magnification before, and other than being much more defined I didn't see much difference in that and what I see in my scans.  That being said, I'm looking at a shadow in both cases as Bart explained...albeit a much better resolved and focused shadow using a microscope.  ;D

If you have a 100% crop from a scan you did with your Imacon I'd love to see it, just for curiousity purposes :)

Idololab

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Yes, I understand that now.  I have seen film grain under magnification before, and other than being much more defined I didn't see much difference in that and what I see in my scans.  That being said, I'm looking at a shadow in both cases as Bart explained...albeit a much better resolved and focused shadow using a microscope.  ;D

If you have a 100% crop from a scan you did with your Imacon I'd love to see it, just for curiousity purposes :)
I will post one  for you when I have time.
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George Marinos
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Fine art Photolab
Athens,Greece

Iluvmycam

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Yes, film, esp BW has a lovely look. Something that is missing with digital BW. But for my use, digital is it and i can't go back to film.
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Idololab

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Yes, I understand that now.  I have seen film grain under magnification before, and other than being much more defined I didn't see much difference in that and what I see in my scans.  That being said, I'm looking at a shadow in both cases as Bart explained...albeit a much better resolved and focused shadow using a microscope.  ;D

If you have a 100% crop from a scan you did with your Imacon I'd love to see it, just for curiousity purposes :)
This is a portion of a 38x56 cm enlargement at 100%.Scanner Imacon 949
Film Tri-X 400 , 135 mm developed in D-76 Dilution 1+1 .
No sharpen at all.About normal contrast.
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George Marinos
http://www.idololab.gr/
Fine art Photolab
Athens,Greece

BernardLanguillier

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Isn't the TrueGrain app available to reproduce real (not simulated) film grains?  http://grubbasoftware.com/
How does this fit into your needs and "picture"? 

Truegrain works very well indeed.

I was trying to give a film look to some D800 wedding images recently and was not 100% convinced by the DxO Filmpack results for B&W. I liked the Truegrain results better.

Cheers,
Bernard
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John Cothron

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This is a portion of a 38x56 cm enlargement at 100%.Scanner Imacon 949
Film Tri-X 400 , 135 mm developed in D-76 Dilution 1+1 .
No sharpen at all.About normal contrast.

Thank you, it's nice to see the kind of scan results the Imacon is capable of.  Far better resolution and sharpness.

plugsnpixels

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You want serious grain, develop your Tri-X in Dektol! I did that out of necessity once in the '70s...

Thanks for the heads-up about TrueGrain, I had not heard of it. Seems to have resumed development after a quiet period.
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