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Author Topic: Candid street shooting  (Read 4216 times)

nemo295

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Re: Candid street shooting
« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2013, 01:49:50 PM »

I agree that if a person is aware of your presence and asks not to be photographed you need to respect that wish.

Absolutely right.

It's also worth noting that the law regarding photographing people in public varies greatly from one country to the next. For example, in the U.S. it's almost always legal to take someone's picture in a public place whether they want you to or not. On the other hand, in France it's often required that you ask someone permission first, if they are the primary subject, i.e., not among a group of people in a park, etc. In Saudi Arabia, taking someone's photograph in public without permission under any circumstance will likely land you in very deep trouble.

But in all cases, common courtesy should prevail when the subject objects to having their picture taken.
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RSL

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Re: Candid street shooting
« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2013, 03:23:28 PM »

Russ,

I'd venture to suggest that it is a marginal difference at best largely influenced by how one feels about 'street' photography.  You and I both are aware that we will never agree on that topic and so it is best just left as a given.

Probably best. But instead of a marginal difference, I'd call it the difference between night and day.

Quote
I will make one observation about it to say:  I do a lot of work with my camera(s) set up in the street it comes with the territory of working in the built environment for architects and developers.  These days that happens mostly with a DSLR and people passing by do sometimes exercise caution or eye-ball me with mild trepidation.  When I do exactly the same thing with a 4x5 camera they express interest, sometimes engage quizzingly or respectfully pass by giving a wide berth.

All down to perceptions I guess.

You're right, Walter. In the sixties I used to do some shooting from the street with a 4 x 5, and with that kind of gear I think passers by recognize that you're not out there for pictures of people. An SLR is a horse of a different color, but if it's on a tripod I think passers by pretty much assume the same thing they assume about a 4 x 5. But if you're doing street photography it doesn't pay to be walking around with a D3 mounted with a 70-200 f/2.8. That rig isn't non-threatening.

cjogo

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Re: Candid street shooting
« Reply #23 on: March 19, 2013, 06:11:55 PM »

I didn't shoot that many portraits with a 4X5 ( except nudes )  but generally a 120 with a 150/250 lens on the street ....   here's the exception :: a shot with the Super Wide in Holland. 

He could not speak English well  BUT wanted to convey he had seen the movie ET & loved American films  ;D
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cjogo

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Re: Candid street shooting
« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2013, 09:46:28 PM »

Tried to be kind -- not too forceful on this charming little girl .   But, this was the days when I traveled with 35mm  ::  K64 and a 105 Nikkor with softar 1 > that was my go to street setup 
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WalterEG

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Re: Candid street shooting
« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2013, 09:57:42 PM »

Source of such memories - the Zeiss Softar.  I remember it fondly.

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cjogo

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Re: Candid street shooting
« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2013, 10:02:12 PM »

Source of such memories - the Zeiss Softar.  I remember it fondly.



Have one for my Rollei SL -- HAssy --  & 3 sizes for DSLR lenses ..  Nice but not worth 'round $100-300 each
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