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Author Topic: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study  (Read 2664 times)

Chris Calohan

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Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« on: March 07, 2013, 10:36:54 AM »

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RSL

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2013, 10:55:38 AM »

I like the light in it, Chris. But the problem with flower pictures is that the guys who shoot for seed catalogs can beat out just about any amateur. And I doubt a grayscale shot of a flower would be featured in a seed catalog. But that light is very, very nice. Is it available light or did you light it?

Rob C

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2013, 11:05:32 AM »

I like the light in it, Chris. But the problem with flower pictures is that the guys who shoot for seed catalogs can beat out just about any amateur. And I doubt a grayscale shot of a flower would be featured in a seed catalog. But that light is very, very nice. Is it available light or did you light it?


Unfortunately, you're right.

That was the prime reason that I gave up trying to incorporate flowers into my stock work: I knew I hadn't the eye or even the access to the perfect blooms. Why waste limited time?

Of course, if your name was Mapplethorpe, you could shoot your lily till the cows came home. And sell it.

Rob C

Chris Calohan

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2013, 11:14:01 AM »

I like the light in it, Chris. But the problem with flower pictures is that the guys who shoot for seed catalogs can beat out just about any amateur. And I doubt a grayscale shot of a flower would be featured in a seed catalog. But that light is very, very nice. Is it available light or did you light it?

Outside shot using a simple circular 12" diffuser. No fill. I never would try to compete against the seed catalogue shooters, though I've shot quite a few Day Lilys for a friend's daylily farm for catalogue shots.
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Chris Calohan

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2013, 11:15:11 AM »

This is the color original.

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Chris Calohan

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2013, 11:17:10 AM »

And a Day Lily shot from the Dragon's Meade collection. It's called, "Mellow Yellow."

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nemo295

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2013, 12:32:46 PM »

Shooting a flower in B&W is a perfectly valid creative endeavor. Robert Mappelthorpe's B&W photographs of flowers, for example, are exquisite.

The main problem with doing flowers in monochrome is hitting on the right B&W conversion filtration to preserve the delicacy and luminosity of the tonal values. Your shot is beautifully lit, so it's important not to destroy the quality of light in the conversion.

The hibiscus is a very brightly colored flower and it's all too easy to end up with harsh tonality. With some judicious tweaking of Photoshop's B&W conversion filters it's possible to overcome this.

Here's what I did with your color original of the same image.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2013, 12:41:00 PM by Doug Frost »
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Chris Calohan

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2013, 12:43:43 PM »

I had that very same look and posted it to another forum who all liked the darker version better..beat me with a stick. Thanks, Doug.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2013, 12:57:31 PM »

I had that very same look and posted it to another forum who all liked the darker version better..

Did not know you frequent Goth sites? ;)

nemo295

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2013, 01:03:01 PM »

I had that very same look and posted it to another forum who all liked the darker version better..beat me with a stick. Thanks, Doug.

Next time, make sure your stick is bigger and don't let them push you around.   ;)
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Chris Calohan

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2013, 01:27:18 PM »

First version

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nemo295

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2013, 01:36:39 PM »

First version


I totally don't get why anyone would prefer dark version over this. But then, there is no accounting for taste.
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Rob C

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2013, 04:47:29 PM »

Yet again an illustrated lesson on the futility of seeking outside opinion.

As ever, do what you think is right, and the hell with the rest of 'em! Nobody's going to respect you if you don't even respect your own opinion as artist/creator/visionary!

;-)

Rob C

Isaac

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #13 on: March 07, 2013, 05:33:59 PM »

But the problem with flower pictures is that the guys who shoot for seed catalogs can beat out just about any amateur.

Seems like more of a general "problem"?
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WalterEG

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #14 on: March 07, 2013, 06:02:53 PM »

Just imagine for a moment, if you will, that Chris has zero ambition to go into the seed catalogue and packaging business.  What if (heaven forbid) he is on a journey of enjoyment and self-discovery.

I am no fan of flowers but I have to say that the floral portraits of Robert Mapplethorpe are sublimely exquisite — and many were in black & white.

Oh, and for Rob C, Viva the Hasselblad that he used to capture those images.

Cheers,

W
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Ed B

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2013, 09:55:48 PM »

I'd never give a second of thought about hanging a color image of a flower on my wall. A black and white one is another story.

*edit*

And I like the darker of the two versions, the way the stamen stands out is what makes it interesting to me.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2013, 10:01:49 PM by Ed B »
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wolfnowl

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2013, 11:26:10 PM »

Love the flower (prefer the lighter version), but not so crazy about the OOF leaf sticking out the right side...

Mike.
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Iluvmycam

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #17 on: March 09, 2013, 07:04:22 PM »

Nice work.

Maybe I'd go for a BW in between light and dark? Don't know.
Looks like it would eat up lots of K ink to print.

Don't worry if someone else has a better flower or any other type of pix than you. If that was the case, none of us would shoot a thing and we would just let the top man / gal in the world click the cam.

Just keep shooting and send in some more!!
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Tonysx

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2013, 07:36:57 PM »

Love the flower (prefer the lighter version), but not so crazy about the OOF leaf sticking out the right side...
Mike.
As a guru said, "there's no accounting for taste" ! I prefer the darker version but agree about the OOF leaf. I thought the image MIGHT look better if it was a bit warmer with the leaf less cr*ppy.....
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Chris Calohan

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Re: Hibiscus, a Monochromatic Study
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2013, 09:09:36 PM »

The leaf is only partially oof and for me, it doesn't just fill out the frame, it also acts as a counter-balance or anchoring point. I did it both ways and can't go with just the flower.
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