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Author Topic: Eric Meola article  (Read 35120 times)

Rob C

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #100 on: January 23, 2013, 06:07:45 PM »

Let's develop the picture further: I seem to remember that in one of Tim Fitzharris' books, he'd used a reflector to light a yucca plant in the foreground of his landscape photo -- does that active interference show photographic creativity?


It shows technique.

Rob C

Dave (Isle of Skye)

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #101 on: January 23, 2013, 06:08:40 PM »


...I don't see any painter as being relevant to this chat: a painter starts of with a blank canvas and an idea - I trust - and then tries to give that life in a medium that takes huge skill to do it well and that's the first difference you encounter with photography...

Rob C

Hi Rob,

In the past I have given and occasionally sold some of my landscape images to artists/painters (one artist in particular who ran art classes and who became quite a regular customer), he and his class then created oil paintings and water colours fully based on my images. I am sure the artist/painter thought he was being creative when he and his students produced these works, which he then occasionally sold and for which I was happy for him to do so, do you think he was being creative when he painted these pictures based on my images?

Dave
« Last Edit: January 23, 2013, 06:10:51 PM by Dave (Isle of Skye) »
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petermfiore

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #102 on: January 23, 2013, 06:12:40 PM »

Hi Rob,

In the past I have given and occasionally sold some of my landscape images to artists/painters (one artist in particular who ran art classes and who became quite a regular customer), he and his class then created oil paintings and water colours fully based on my images. I am sure the artist/painter thought he was being creative when he and his students produced these works, which he then occasionally sold and for which I was happy for him to do so, do you think he was being creative?

Dave
If they copy it no. If they interpret it, yes. Same goes for painting from life.

Peter

Rob C

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #103 on: January 23, 2013, 06:24:16 PM »

Hi Rob,

In the past I have given and occasionally sold some of my landscape images to artists/painters (one artist in particular who ran art classes and who became quite a regular customer), he and his class then created oil paintings and water colours fully based on my images. I am sure the artist/painter thought he was being creative when he and his students produced these works, which he then occasionally sold and for which I was happy for him to do so, do you think he was being creative when he painted these pictures based on my images?

Dave



As a kid, I used to trawl art galleries and buy postcards of Monet, Manet, Vincent, Cezanne, Renoir, Dali, the lot of them. I'd then copy those to the best of my ability because I enjoyed doing that. I remember with affection a particularly accurate one of Christ of St John on the Cross. Do you think that I was making art? I don't think that I had that delusion, but it was all so long ago and perhaps I did...

Rob C

Dave (Isle of Skye)

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #104 on: January 23, 2013, 06:32:14 PM »

If they copy it no. If they interpret it, yes. Same goes for painting from life.

Peter

I refer you to Slobodan's question regarding Cézanne..  :)

Dave
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Isaac

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #105 on: January 23, 2013, 06:51:46 PM »

[a reflector to light a yucca plant] -- It shows technique.

So, by active interference, you mostly mean re-arrangement of the objects in the scene into a composition?
« Last Edit: January 23, 2013, 06:54:54 PM by Isaac »
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #106 on: January 23, 2013, 06:52:19 PM »

So, back to Cézanne. I know there are people who hate to click on provided links. As a public service, I am attaching the cover of that book

What do we see there? If just glancing casually, and without enlarging, we see, of course, a Cézanne. But look closer, and you'll see that the left third is actually a photograph. The rest of the book is full of such examples, of almost photorealistic representation of found reality (again, in terms of viewpoints and elements, not technique). In other words, and as Peter already has pointed out, art/creativity is not about the subject, but its interpretation, and the connection it creates with viewers (i.e., communication).

petermfiore

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #107 on: January 23, 2013, 08:22:30 PM »

Cézanne invented the deconstruction of form which opened the door for cubism. I think that qualifies for a new vision!!!!!

Don't you think?

Peter

petermfiore

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #108 on: January 23, 2013, 08:29:20 PM »

Since I am an artist i would like to share an artist's statement. It's the why an artist's paints.
In this case it's mine.

Peter




Artist's Statement
I am interested in making the simple profound, always searching for that universal moment in the world around us. I draw inspiration for my landscape paintings from many places, but most of it comes from the fields and meadows near my home in rural Pennsylvania along the Delaware River. I used to think that I had to travel far to find interesting motifs, but now I just walk out my door and it's all there.
The abstract marks that I make are used to interpret nature's tangle. Making visual sense and constructing order by structuring shape, form, tone, color and rhythm to create a palpable reality.

I like to visit a motif over and over again. I am especially drawn to the winter landscape. It is a time when the earth loses its leafy covering and reveals it's true self. Covered in snow, the world reflects light and creates a spectrum of colors that are both dramatic and beautiful.

The true subject in any of my paintings is light and how it defines and endlessly changes the landscape around us. For me, light is more than a visual tool, it is an emotional subject. It is through the manipulation of light – how it falls, changes, sculpts, colors and creates various moods on a subject – that intrigues and inspires me.


Peter Fiore

Isaac

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #109 on: January 23, 2013, 09:46:59 PM »

The essence of photographic creativity, in my sense/understanding of the term, is that the photographer has put together something that did not and would not have existed without his active interference in the status quo.
Lets enlarge a bit on this statement and its implications. ...

Just to take your comment as an example of the responses made over the last few days, I think there's a failure to address the point.

I think it will be hard to successfully argue that a landscape photographer is able to exert as much artistic control as Andy Ilachinski when he photographs color-infused reflections from a glass.

I think it will be hard to successfully argue that Ansel Adams was able to exert as much artistic control when he photographed landscapes as when he photographed "Still Life, San Francisco, California (c.1932)".

But it would be nice if someone at least tried, instead of failing to distract Rob C. with issues that are beside the point ;-)
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Tony Jay

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #110 on: January 24, 2013, 03:07:20 AM »

Take consolation from Sieff, as quoted above: we can all think of ourselves as artists, regardless of the cream or the crap that we may or may not produce: everybody wins! True democracy at its very best! I love it.

Not everybody wins.
Everybody can produce art - that is not difficult.
Not everybody can produce good art - that is much more difficult.

Tony Jay
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KLaban

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #111 on: January 24, 2013, 04:16:50 AM »

I've just dusted off the heavy tome 'Art. The Rule Book'.

I quote

(Rule No. 1) There are no rules.

Right, I'm off to Ye Olde Coffee Corner for even more fun.
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Rob C

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #112 on: January 24, 2013, 04:18:36 AM »

So, by active interference, you mostly mean re-arrangement of the objects in the scene into a composition?


Taking your question at face value, often dangerous, I say yes; but I also add this: you can distort any argument to its absurd limit in pursuit of a point.

I do not look upon changing the camera position, if that's the total photographic input, as being 'creative'; as indicated ad nauseam, I see that as fine-tuning what's already there. I've also stated several times that the ability to do that is what I call having a good eye. The two, a good eye and creativity do sometimes run together but not always. I would attempt to illustrate this difference by quoting the ability of the interior designer with that of the discerning client who knows what he wants to achieve, but not how to do it.

In the case of the still life example, I read a certain dismissiveness in some quarters about the simple(?) act of rearranging given objects. That can be a simple matter for a gifted photographer but impossible for one devoid of the gift. And there we touch upon one of the forbidden fruit: few like to accept that much of the ability to be creative (in an artistic sense) is inborn, As someone wrote: poets are born, not made.

Rob C
« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 04:45:36 AM by Rob C »
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Rob C

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #113 on: January 24, 2013, 04:24:29 AM »

I've just dusted off the heavy tome 'Art. The Rule Book'.

I quote

(Rule No. 1) There are no rules.

Right, I'm off to Ye Olde Coffee Corner for even more fun.



Hi Keith,

What's Rule No. 2?

;-)

Rob

Rob C

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #114 on: January 24, 2013, 04:28:27 AM »

Not everybody wins.
Everybody can produce art - that is not difficult.Not everybody can produce good art - that is much more difficult.

Tony Jay


Inevitably, Tony, it depends on whose definition one is applying. By some, your statement is absolutely correct; by mine, it's flawed if not downright mistaken. Ping, pong; ping, pong; ping - point!

Heysoos this gets tiring!

;-)

Rob C

Rob C

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #115 on: January 24, 2013, 04:42:41 AM »

So, back to Cézanne. I know there are people who hate to click on provided links. As a public service, I am attaching the cover of that book

What do we see there? If just glancing casually, and without enlarging, we see, of course, a Cézanne. But look closer, and you'll see that the left third is actually a photograph. The rest of the book is full of such examples, of almost photorealistic representation of found reality (again, in terms of viewpoints and elements, not technique). In other words, and as Peter already has pointed out, art/creativity is not about the subject, but its interpretation, and the connection it creates with viewers (i.e., communication).


More like simulacra, Slobodan. I'm sory, but I think I'm missing the point you want to make here.

Regarding Peter, that's a red herring: as a painter, Peter can hardly avoid being creative by the mere fact of the tools and where he starts and where he goes. That was one of the very first objections against photography-as-art from its beginnings. That much opinion has changed is more to do with conditioning from interested quarters than from any freshly found value intrinsic to the craft of the snap!

Look: you are a photographer; you do some fantastic cityscapes and also some very pleasing pics of your daughter. I think those of your girl are art but those of the city are acute observation. That's not to diminish them in the least - but that I had your eye for city - it's simply that the two fields are different and require different abilities. One is not inferior to the other, just different. Technique, in both genres, is a given.

Rob C

Tony Jay

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #116 on: January 24, 2013, 05:01:38 AM »

...Heysoos this gets tiring!

Rob, with respect, you have been pushing your point of view pretty strongly.
You can move along anytime at your discretion.

Tony Jay
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Dave (Isle of Skye)

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #117 on: January 24, 2013, 05:25:04 AM »

Vermeer and others, according to David Hockney, painted directly over an image created on canvas by a camera obscura (See here for a very interesting documentary discussing this). Vermeer was undeniably a great and creative artist, an old master in fact. But it seems he was in actual fact a very early photographer, only using paint instead of pixels or film to capture exactly what the camera provided for him.

No longer tryig to win or lose points in this discussion, but I just thought I would add this final thought into the mix and for everyones edification - and whilst I am at it, here's an enjoyable but brief passage on "The Truth in Landscape" regarding photography written by Robert Adams.

Dave
« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 11:32:57 AM by Dave (Isle of Skye) »
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Dan Glynhampton

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #118 on: January 24, 2013, 08:38:31 AM »


What's Rule No. 2?


In my copy of the book it says

(Rule No. 2) See Rule No.1

 :)
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Rob C

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Re: Eric Meola article
« Reply #119 on: January 24, 2013, 09:04:19 AM »

Rob, with respect, you have been pushing your point of view pretty strongly.
You can move along anytime at your discretion.

Tony Jay


True, Tony; but I'm hardly going to push a point of view with which I disagree, am I, or lapse into silence because of possible/probable disapproval of the good and the great, or is that the new politic you are proposing? I'll save you effort: I'll move on down the line as suggested.

Hast la vista.

Rob C
« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 11:45:35 AM by Rob C »
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