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Author Topic: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3  (Read 1230 times)

Mjollnir

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Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« on: January 13, 2013, 11:37:27 AM »

Had to crop a lot of this since framing was really difficult due to the extraordinary intensity of the light that morning.  My question is:  would you have cropped it even more?


Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3 by tanngrisnir3, on Flickr
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2013, 12:30:36 PM »

Once you mention that this is a crop, there is no way our minds could escape the nagging question of what was the original like. You know, like the old trick of saying to someone not to think of an elephant.

So, to answer your direct question: no, I probably wouldn't crop further. But that is not the whole truth either. Because if I knew what was around, maybe I would crop it differently, even if ever so slightly.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 05:45:01 PM by Slobodan Blagojevic »
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Rob C

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2013, 01:16:10 PM »

Yes, I think I'd either crop away the excess branch cluster on the top left or, if possible, clone it away.

I like the idea of branches right across the top, but not from a different source.

Rob C

Mjollnir

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2013, 01:19:56 PM »

Yes, I think I'd either crop away the excess branch cluster on the top left or, if possible, clone it away.

I like the idea of branches right across the top, but not from a different source.

Rob C

Coincidentally, I cropped the hell out of the upper frame left corner just to get to where it is, since there were a LOT more branches.

I don't want to lose the oak silhouetted in the background, but that one, specific cluster could actually go and w/out losing it, methinks.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 01:21:52 PM by Mjollnir »
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kikashi

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2013, 02:43:55 PM »

Had to crop a lot of this since framing was really difficult due to the extraordinary intensity of the light that morning.  My question is:  would you have cropped it even more?

No. Perhaps less, perhaps differently, but certainly not more.

Jeremy
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WalterEG

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2013, 02:56:22 PM »

I am inclined to think it is best reduced to an extract by removing the tree trunk.  The inclusion of the trunk keeps the image locked into documentation, for me, whereas to strip away the left branch that Rob mentioned and the right hand trunk and just be left with the central portion might elevate the image to something more ethereal.

You did well seizing this opportunity as you did.


W
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Rob C

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2013, 04:29:59 PM »

I am inclined to think it is best reduced to an extract by removing the tree trunk.  The inclusion of the trunk keeps the image locked into documentation, for me, whereas to strip away the left branch that Rob mentioned and the right hand trunk and just be left with the central portion might elevate the image to something more ethereal.You did well seizing this opportunity as you did.


W




Never thought about that; yes, it does take it out of straight landscape. I'd give that idea a whirl, were it my picture.

Just shows you: there are so many ways to skin some cats.

Rob C

RSL

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2013, 04:35:12 PM »

If you crop it any more you'll destroy the eye-leading diagonal that runs from lower right to upper left. But I'm with Slobodan: I'd want to see the original before I'd be willing to make any serious suggestions.

francois

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2013, 07:02:31 AM »

Coincidentally, I cropped the hell out of the upper frame left corner just to get to where it is, since there were a LOT more branches.

I don't want to lose the oak silhouetted in the background, but that one, specific cluster could actually go and w/out losing it, methinks.

I like it as it is. I tried different crops and I think that this very nice image would loose its balance.
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Francois

Chris Calohan

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2013, 09:22:34 AM »

I like it just as it sits...Contrary to most of the more erudite thinking on here, I am more bothered by the crop in the middle of the crook of the tree than by the extraneous hanging chads (that's a Florida thing). ANn even there presence isn't a deal breaker for me.

Funny though, and this is some of my dyslexia showing through, when I first looked at the title: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3, I saw (forgive me) Horned Toad Oak, fog #3 and I can't get it out of my head. It's like that song you keep singing over and over until someone slaps the snot out of you, and you finally quit...please, someone, slap me!
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What! Me Worry?

Rob C

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Re: Hornitos Road Oak, Fog #3
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2013, 10:07:50 AM »

Don't let it worry you: we have a poster here who, to me, is always read as Alfasud.

What can you do? Even my fingers have a mind of their own and the rewrites are so exhausting! Worse, I find that I can get wrapped up in something using the tiny writing slot provided here that should have been written in Word, and then I lose the damned thing entirely by hitting the wrong spot on the screen. This happened today when I was writing a reply about Eric Meola's article: I can't write the same thing twice, so I gave up.

;-(

Rob C
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