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Author Topic: Eco Print Shield and Timeless  (Read 2233 times)

Didymus

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Eco Print Shield and Timeless
« on: October 05, 2012, 03:33:24 PM »

When I began stretching canvas I used Eco Print Shield. I am now using Timeless and I can't seem to get the hang of it.  I've been successful but it's hit and miss.  Sometimes I still see white after it has dried.  I'm assuming it is because, unlike Eco, Timeless only calls for one coat and no dilution.  I'm really trying to work it in a lot but maybe it's not enough.  Does anyone have any advice, experience or preference?

Thanks,
Tommy
« Last Edit: October 05, 2012, 03:37:30 PM by didymus »
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Stephen G

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Re: Eco Print Shield and Timeless
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2012, 04:36:46 AM »

Sometimes I get little white/lighter patches that remain after drying if I've used too much coating.

For larger prints I apply 2 coats: the first is worked in a lot and I don't care much if I see lines or bubbles. The second coat I apply more gently and smoothly, trying to avoid bubbles and roller lines. It is this second coat that is key: too much Timeless on the roller and I get the white patches. Hard to say how much is enough - kind of an experience thing.

For smaller prints I just use a saturated roller, work in the coating and then roll progressively lighter and lighter to smooth off the coating. Sometimes I use a bulb blower to pop unruly bubbles.
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Didymus

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Re: Eco Print Shield and Timeless
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2012, 03:34:38 PM »

Very helpful, thank you.
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douvidl

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Re: Eco Print Shield and Timeless
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2012, 11:07:45 PM »

I have found that Timeless is not a product that can be used on all canvas.  I would be careful.  I have ruined about 6' of canvas trying to roll timeless.  Now I only use  spray Print Shield, once before streching and once again after.  So far very satisfactory results.  Check back in 20 years for a report.
David
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Didymus

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Re: Eco Print Shield and Timeless
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2012, 01:58:50 AM »

I'm using Lyve.
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douvidl

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Re: Eco Print Shield and Timeless
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2012, 03:03:34 PM »

I'm told that Timeless was designed for Lyvle and can't be rolled on gloss canvas, only sprayed.  But sprayed and rolled on matt canvas.
Best of luck.
David
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GaryBarker

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Re: Eco Print Shield and Timeless
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2012, 04:45:55 PM »

Tommy,
Just curious as to why you moved away from Eco Print Shield?
Gary
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Gary Barker
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Didymus

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Re: Eco Print Shield and Timeless
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2012, 05:26:14 PM »

Since Epson switched to the exhibition canvas I decided to go with BC Lyve.  My gallon of Eco was out shortly after that and I decided to get Timeless to go along with the Lyve canvas.  I just thought it made sense to use the two Breathing Color products together.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2012, 05:27:45 PM by didymus »
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Charles Wood

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Re: Eco Print Shield and Timeless
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2012, 05:44:13 PM »

FWIW, I've never used Timeless but I have used diluted Glamour II and the generic ready to spray coatings from Lexjet.  I use the prior version of the current Wagner 518080 HLVP sprayer. I tried rolling coatings on canvas early on and quickly gave it up.  Unless you're trying to create a textured surface, in my opinion, spraying is the only way to create a professional, uniform coating.

My technique is pretty simple. I place the printed canvas on a large flat surface, outdoors, and apply the spray coating back and forth in much the same way an autobody painter applies paint. I start the spray before reaching the edge of the canvas, to avoid drips, and overlap passes, all in one direction.  Instead of waiting for that coat to dry, I immediately start passes at 90 degrees to the first pass.  When I have finished the canvas has a slightly milky look that dries clear. If there are bubbles in the coating I use the pressure of the compressed air that comes out of the sprayer to level the bubbles. I spray at about 8-12 inches from the canvas surface. 

It's really pretty easy once you do it a few times and the results are predictable.
    
   
   
   
   

 
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