Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: New Lens Concept  (Read 1292 times)

Dale Villeponteaux

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 259
New Lens Concept
« on: September 21, 2012, 04:22:22 AM »

Logged
My avatar isn't an accurate portrayal; I have much less hair.

Fips

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 195
    • some unrelated photos on flickr
Re: New Lens Concept
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2012, 04:36:55 AM »

Has been discussed here.
It only works at a typical telco wavelength, i.e. in the infrared yet. For the visible spectrum the nanoantennas would need to be much smaller or you need to come up with the right substrate. It's tricky to say the least.
Logged

Dale Villeponteaux

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 259
Re: New Lens Concept
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2012, 02:35:34 PM »

Oops!  I didn't know it had already been posted.  I don't see how the substrate matters (though I know nothing of this kind of physics).  It would seem the problem would be placing the right sized antennae evenly.  And one size of antennae for each frequency of the visible spectrum.  I would have thought the substrate would be transparent to a wide spectrum of electromagnetic frequencies.

In the mid-sixties, I read an article in Scientific American about the possibility of guiding droplets of ink to precise placement on paper.  I have now owned at least three generations of ink jet printers.  However, if these lens take as long to solve the engineering problems, by the time they get to market I won't be around to marvel at them.

Dale
Logged
My avatar isn't an accurate portrayal; I have much less hair.

Fips

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 195
    • some unrelated photos on flickr
Re: New Lens Concept
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2012, 02:59:39 PM »

Quote
I don't see how the substrate matters

The substrate has a large influence on the plasmon frequency of the gold which the nanoantennas are made of. The plasmon frequency in turn determines the size of the antenna. For many substrates they would have too small to either work or the be producible at all. Also, below a certain size you have to use fancy techniques such as electron beam lithography which is not really compatible with mass production.
Having said that, I'm certain that metamaterials will be a big think in the not-so-distant future.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up