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Author Topic: How to make 2 monitor look the same (simular)  (Read 6162 times)

aaronchan

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How to make 2 monitor look the same (simular)
« on: August 29, 2012, 04:19:06 AM »

Dear all,

I have 2 computers sitting side by side with 2 monitors, they are not the same model.
Since I know that we can do digital hard proof in printing, which use a larger gamut printer to print out a proof that simulate the smaller gamut device such as offset press.
Is it possible to do it for the monitor as well?
Let say I have a Philips IPS panel LCD monitor and want to simulate a TN panel LG monitor

Thanks
aaron

stamper

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Re: How to make 2 monitor look the same (simular)
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2012, 04:51:02 AM »

You said it yourself, they aren't the same. When I calibrate with Spyder 4 the same calibrated output is loaded for the two monitors which are different models. I believe there are calibrators that calibrate for two monitors but if they are different models then I don't see the point. If it is to match print then use the "better" monitor for matching.

Simon Garrett

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Re: How to make 2 monitor look the same (simular)
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2012, 06:00:33 AM »

I'm probably missing something, but I can't see the point in doing this either!

I have two monitors, one wide-gamut and one normal (close to sRGB), and I have calibrated/profiled both (I use a ColorMunki Display - the cheaper version).  That means that for most pictures, when using colour-managed software the two monitors look identical.  Only for the minority of pictures with colours outside sRGB gamut do they look different, and then only for highly saturated colours outside sRGB. 

But I can't really see why I'd want to simulate one on the other. 
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aaronchan

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Re: How to make 2 monitor look the same (simular)
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2012, 12:38:15 PM »

I know this is pointless for most of the people, but let's put this in a theoretical/ technical way to look on my question.
Sometimes it's not about is it useful or not, but to solve a meaningless problem still might get to some other useful question or even might gonna help you in some unique situation.

Specially if a printer can do that, why can we map a large gamut LCD to a smaller gamut LCD where can display exactly same color on both monitor.

aaron

Rhossydd

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Re: How to make 2 monitor look the same (simular)
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2012, 01:21:54 PM »

can we map a large gamut LCD to a smaller gamut LCD where can display exactly same color on both monitor.
Give that some thought for a moment.

Yes, you might be able to simulate a smaller gamut display on a larger gamut display, but not the other way round.
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Simon Garrett

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Re: How to make 2 monitor look the same (simular)
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2012, 04:20:11 PM »

Well, here are some ways you could simulate a specific smaller gamut display on a larger gamut display. 

First, you will need to get profiles for both displays.  The wide-gamut display - the one you are going to use to simulate the TN monitor - you just need to calibrate and profile in the normal way (with a hardware device - Spyder, ColorMunki or whatever).  The narrow-gamut (TN) monitor, you need to calibrate and profile that too, in order to create a profile, which you save. 

Some options now:
  • If you have software capable of soft proofing (e.g. Lightroom, Photoshop etc), use that in soft proof mode for your test image, using the wide-gamut (calibrated and profiled) monitor, and specify the profile you've created for the narrow-gamut TN monitor as the profile to simulate.
  • Use Photoshop or other software and convert your test image to the profile you've created for the narrow-gamut TN monitor (and see how it looks on your wide-gamut display).

Is that the sort of thing you mean? 

Your last post was not very clear: 
  • By "why can we map a..."  I assume you mean "how can we map a...". 
  • When you say "...where can display exactly same color on both monitor..." well, the way you get exactly the same colour on two monitors is simply to calibrate and profile them, and use colour managed software.

Sorry if I'm not correctly interpreting what you are saying.  In that case, perhaps you can explain more the purpose of what you are trying to do, to see if I can understand it that way. 
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