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Author Topic: Hipsters stunned as vintage cameras fail to make them professional photographers  (Read 12472 times)

Rob C

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Funny, but also possibly tragic? Like?

Rob C

SunnyUK

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Funny. And sadly with a lot of truth.
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lfeagan

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Thanks for posting. Quite entertaining.
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Lance

Nikon: D700, D800E, PC-E 24mm f/3.5D ED, PC-E 45mm f/2.8D ED, PC-E 85mm f/2.8D, 50mm f/1.4G, 14-24 f/2.8G ED, 24-70 f/2.8G ED, 70-200 f/2.8G ED VR II, 400mm f/2.8G ED VR
Fuji: X-Pro 1, 14mm f/2.8, 18mm f/2.0, 35mm f/1.4

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Funny. And sadly with a lot of truth.
Yup.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website. New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

bill t.

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So which vintage camera will get me into a really hip Soho gallery the fastest?  I'm concerned that my old Fotron might not be truly Hip.

Oh wait, I have to wear tight jeans?  Never mind!

Required viewing for all photo hipsters.  Be sure your camera never flinches.  The last flic in cinema history to use the shoot-it-backwards potassium ferricyanide bleach-out trick to simulate photo development.  And BTW just where are MY groupies?

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RSL

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Don't jump to any hasty conclusions until you've checked Rhein II by Andreas Gursky. These kids may be knocking down sales in the seven figures if they can penetrate the "fine art" market through Christie's. Nothing they do could be any more boring than Rhein II.

bill t.

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Nothing they do could be any more boring than Rhein II.

I'm not so sure about that, see attached image.

But honestly, there are pretty nice images lurking within "Holga" and "Horita" searches, I would be wrong to deny that.

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opgr

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    • theimagingfactory

Nothing they do could be any more boring than Rhein II.

You sum up the entire point of that picture very well…
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Regards,
Oscar Rysdyk
theimagingfactory

bill t.

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I think I can conclusively say, Andreas was NOT BORED the day he deposited that $4,300,000 check at the bank, and I'm sure he felt very hip indeed for weeks afterward.

I have to admit that the first time I saw Rhine II it really did catch my eye, even knowing nothing of the back story.  Sorry, but it's not without merit, maybe about $8,000 worth.

Can anybody reference a high priced photo that actually earned its toll?
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opgr

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I think I can conclusively say, Andreas was NOT BORED the day he deposited that $4,300,000 check at the bank, and I'm sure he felt very hip indeed for weeks afterward.

I have to admit that the first time I saw Rhine II it really did catch my eye, even knowing nothing of the back story.  Sorry, but it's not without merit, maybe about $8,000 worth.

Can anybody reference a high priced photo that actually earned its toll?

Unfortunately they don't have pills to fight off Capitalism eating away at your brain.
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Oscar Rysdyk
theimagingfactory

Rob C

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Unfortunately they don't have pills to fight off Capitalism eating away at your brain.



Not sure about the pills, but there is a logic to the purchase of the picture. It's about an alternative token of financial value, and since such tokens depend on the 'money' accepting/recognizing the tokens, the rules are written by those with the money. It's no more strange than buying gold or platinum as hedge against currency fluctuations.

Most boring? Wait for Rhine 3.

Rob C
« Last Edit: August 15, 2012, 05:17:21 PM by Rob C »
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bill t.

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Not sure about the pills, but there is a logic to the purchase of the picture. It's about an alternative token of financial value, and since such tokens depend on the 'money' accepting/recognizing the tokens, the rules are written by those with the money. It's no more strange than buying gold or platinum as hedge against currency fluctuations.

Except platinum and gold are going to outlast a Type-C print glued to a piece of plex with what amounts to rubber cement by about a billion to 1.  Proletariat 1, Capitalist Pigs 0.
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opgr

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    • theimagingfactory

It's one thing to consider the merit of Art as an investment,
it's entirely another to base the merit of Art on an investment.
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Regards,
Oscar Rysdyk
theimagingfactory

opgr

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And before I get misinterpreted:

I think that picture is absolutely brilliant.
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Oscar Rysdyk
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RSL

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Not sure about the pills, but there is a logic to the purchase of the picture. It's about an alternative token of financial value, and since such tokens depend on the 'money' accepting/recognizing the tokens, the rules are written by those with the money. It's no more strange than buying gold or platinum as hedge against currency fluctuations.

Most boring? Wait for Rhine 3.

I knew you had the picture (to coin a phrase), Rob. The "fine art" world actually is a cult.

Rob C

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Except platinum and gold are going to outlast a Type-C print glued to a piece of plex with what amounts to rubber cement by about a billion to 1.  Proletariat 1, Capitalist Pigs 0.


Bill, the proles aren't even in the stadium; they're on their couch with their noses in the ersatz pizza and generic cola in the other hand, their eyes on the 'reality' show, minds (to stretch a point) in a state of suspended animation.

Lunch was quite nice, but I'm not sure why the chef insists on putting fish into batter when it's so much more delectable in dried breadcrumbs. It was rather hot for walking, but there you go: summer. Come winter and its expensive wood for the fire and I shall be just as unhappy. Why has Life no state of perfection? Do I think too much? Do I not think sufficiently? Is the world going to pot - has the world gone to pot? Does anyone notice or care?

Rob C

Chris Pollock

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Lunch was quite nice, but I'm not sure why the chef insists on putting fish into batter when it's so much more delectable in dried breadcrumbs.
He probably does it to save time. Dipping seafood in batter is quicker than coating it in breadcrumbs. I use breadcrumbs or cornflake crumbs myself, and making a seafood dinner for the family is quite an undertaking.
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Rob C

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He probably does it to save time. Dipping seafood in batter is quicker than coating it in breadcrumbs. I use breadcrumbs or cornflake crumbs myself, and making a seafood dinner for the family is quite an undertaking.


Now that is truly sacrilege, Guinness in other threads notwithstanding!

Rob C

Justinr

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Batter made with Guinness, I'm told, is very tasty indeed.   :D
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