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Author Topic: Interview with portrait photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and 2 supermodel  (Read 2658 times)

Ellis Vener

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NPR's "Fresh Air With Terry Gross has a terrific interview with Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, and super models Beverly Johnson and Carol Alt  on the above mentioned NPR show tonight. Here is the link: http://www.npr.org/2012/07/30/157590245/getting-old-is-hard-even-and-especially-for-models

They were plugging the HBO documentary directed by Greenfield-Sanders: "About Face: The Supermodels Then and Now."

Beverly Johnson was very articulate about the difficulties of being a black model at a time when high-end fashion and advertising photographers did not know how to light black people; stylists didn't knowwhat to do with their hair; makeup artists didn't know what to do with their skin;  and Kodak films had difficulty with non-caucasian skin tones (According to Greenfield-Sanders most photographers still don't know how to light for black skin or expose for it either)

Both Alt & Johnson  are good on how short a top model's career is, and Terry Gross asks good questions aboutbeing photogrpahed and Greenfield-Sanders has good short answers.
Timothy Greenfield-Sanders: http://www.greenfield-sanders.com/
Beverly Johnson : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beverly_Johnson
Carol Alt: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carol_Alt ( do not go to Carolalt.com  as it seems to be hacked)
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Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.

quismond

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« Last Edit: August 12, 2012, 02:00:59 PM by quismond »
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Rob C

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I'm surprised that the supermodels are supposed to suffer from short careers.

One could write a list of those still working and making more money than I could dream about. Maybe two or three decads at several million bucks per year ain't so bad.

The problem, if there is one, is that almost every model today who has a modicum of success is called a super, so the marque is devalued. But the real ones keep right on truckin'.

Rob C
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