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Author Topic: Lofoten, Norway  (Read 19470 times)

FredrickFjeldsbo

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Lofoten, Norway
« on: May 06, 2012, 04:19:02 PM »

Hello.

Have anyone of you ever been to Lofoten in Norway? I'll be moving there later this year and was wondering if anyone had some images from  lofoten and some photography locations. I'll be living there for 9 months, so I guess I'll be able to make a lot of images.

Thanks.
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eleanorbrown

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2012, 05:51:15 PM »

I'll be going on a National Geographic Expedition  trip to the High Arctic and also western Norway including this area in 2013.  I've been looking for photos also and found this link (beautiful work by a Colorado photographer: http://www.widerange.org/gallery/norway/
Eleanor

Hello.

Have anyone of you ever been to Lofoten in Norway? I'll be moving there later this year and was wondering if anyone had some images from  lofoten and some photography locations. I'll be living there for 9 months, so I guess I'll be able to make a lot of images.

Thanks.

JohnBrew

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2012, 05:52:52 PM »

Check Nikongear. A group of Nikon photographers gathered there recently for the express purpose of sharing their photography and comradeship and they posted an abundance of images from Lofoten. It looks a most interesting place, but far too cold for this man from Texas.

aduke

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2012, 05:54:14 PM »

There are some images on Google Maps/Earth. The latter is somewhat easier to deal with, but both will show images from Panaramio.

Alan
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eleanorbrown

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2012, 08:49:59 PM »

I also get on my iPad and open the map and do "street view"all over Norway.  Every highway and almost all roads are street view mapped and it is great for sightseeing!  Norway is an incredibly beautiful country....it would be on my list of the few countries I would be willing to live in!  Simply beautiful and I wander through the country on street view all the time!  Fun. eleanor

john beardsworth

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2012, 03:28:39 PM »

Lisa Nikodym

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2012, 06:29:48 PM »

I was there on vacation about 5-10 years ago, and am going back for a week later this month.  It's gorgeous.  It's hard to recommend any particular locations, since so much is stunning, except make sure to get to Reinefjord - that's the very best bit (and there's a small ferry that travels around that fjord several times a day - highly recommended for great views).  In general, the farther southwest you go, the more dramatic the scenery.

If you want to see images from my last trip there, go here and look for ones labelled "Lofoten Islands" (clicking on them brings up larger versions with commentary):
http://www.stanford.edu/~melkor/lisa_pictures/NEurope.html
I was there in late September before, and saw only one other tourist the entire week.  It rained and was cloudy a lot, however.  I picked May this time because May-June is the least rainy time of the year, according to my research.  Wish me better luck this time...

Lisa

sdwilsonsct

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2012, 08:35:30 PM »

Yeah, see Jack Brauer's site.  <sigh>
Take the ferry across the malstrom to Vaerøy.
Another advantage of May-July is 12 hours of evening, midnight and morning light.
You'll love it.
Scott

stever

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2012, 12:19:06 AM »

in 9 months you should make a LOT of images.  probably all of us on this board have been tourists is the summer when it is usually a lovely place.  although i don't envy you spending the dark winter in the land of the $10 beer, i can visualize incredible landscape, harbor, fishing images in often nasty weather.  you need a good high ISO camera that is weather sealed and a good camera cover as well - with suitable protection for yourself.  there are a lot of possibilities.
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JGU1956

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2012, 08:50:57 AM »

Fredrick,

You are in for a TREAT!  Norway is an incredible place to photograph, especially the landscapes but not limited to that, and the Lofoten Islands look to be some of the best of that country.

I haven't been on the Lofotens, merely through part of them on the Hurtigruten (coastal ship) which is expensive but a very useful intro to the area.  You can travel just part of the Hurtigruten's route, you don't have to do all of the Bergen-Kirkenes-Bergen route.

Although winter is challenging it's not as bad along the coast as you might expect.  The Gulf Stream (warmer water than the Arctic) modifies the local climate significantly.  Inland is much colder but don't let that put you off.  Summer is a bit disorienting because you tend to go without sleep for days and then collapse in a heap  ;).

The Gulf Stream is what makes the winter fishery around the Lofotens so good.  Make sure you get lots of pics of the cod (torsk) drying on racks- nice patterns as well as being a distinctive local sight.

If you are going to be there in late autumn/winter, be prepared for the highly spectacular Aurora Borealis.  This article http://www.luminous-landscape.com/techniques/aurora-md.shtml has lots of good advice (spare batteries and good high ISO performance seem top of the list).

And although this is a little further inland, you must visit Lyngen Fjord (both summer and winter)- it's a stunning area.  Lyngseidet has a charming timber church (built 1731).  All of the villages and towns north of Lyngseidet were burned to the ground in late 1944/early 1945 as the German army retreated before the Russian advance, so Lyngseidet was incredibly lucky.  The church (typically for churches in coastal Norway) has a model sailing vessel suspended above the altar.  Before oil and gas made Norway rich (late 60s) it was a very poor country and the main occupations in coastal areas were seafaring, fishing and pilotage.  Navigating those island- and skerry- ridden waters in winter storms without a weather forecast must have been, well, words fail me.  Lots of men didn't come home from the sea.  My father grew up in Lyngseidet in the 20s and 30s so I'm seriously biased, but it really is a great part of the world.

If possible try to get acquainted with some locals with boats- maritime photography makes a welcome change from land-based (different subjects, different perspective), and you'll be in an area which is half water anyway.  If you're going to be there after about October/November you should be able to ski- you don't have to of course, but it will make getting around far easier.  And as others have noted, good clothing for the winter months and camera sealing/protection for the maritime jaunts.  Maybe get a sea kayak if you have the skills- that would be one of the best ways to get around the islands.  (That's on my bucket list....)

The natural features are of course the principal attraction, but don't ignore modernity.  There are some spectacular bridges and tunnels between islands worth some photographic time too.  More controversially there is a strong push at the moment for oil and gas exploration off the Lofotens.  At the moment Norway's oil and gas comes from other offshore regions.  There might be some good opportunities there although I don't know whether the proposals have gone beyond paper submissions.  I don't think the local fisherpeople are at all impressed with the prospect.

People say Norway is expensive.  They are absolutely right.  The best thing to do is research as much as you can from home (lots of useful web sites with English language options if you click on the Union Jack), spreadsheet the trip to the nth degree, then go and have fun and try not to obsess too much about the cost.

One more thing- you'd better like eating fish  ;D.

John.
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JGU1956

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2012, 09:01:28 AM »

And furthermore, for some excellent photos of the Lofotens and Norway more generally, have a look at Grant Dixon's site http://www.grantdixonphotography.com.au/galleries/index.php and click on Europe/Norway.
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Bjørn J

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2012, 03:28:05 PM »

For landscape and nature photographers Lofoten is a fantastic location, both summer and winter.
I used to live in Lofoten for many years, now I go there at least two or three times a year. I always see new things to photograph there,
the light and weather changes all the time.
You can have a look at some of my photos on www.arcticphoto.no
There are links to Lofoten summer and Lofoten winter.

Bjørn J
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eleanorbrown

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2012, 09:42:19 PM »

Bjorn, the images on your site art stunning! How fortunate you are to live in northern Norway!  Noticed some very wide angle shots that are particularly beautiful...I was wondering about your wide angle lens selections?  I am going to costal Norway next yeat and am trying to decide on lens selections. Any suggestions welcome and thanks! Eleanor

For landscape and nature photographers Lofoten is a fantastic location, both summer and winter.
I used to live in Lofoten for many years, now I go there at least two or three times a year. I always see new things to photograph there,
the light and weather changes all the time.
You can have a look at some of my photos on www.arcticphoto.no
There are links to Lofoten summer and Lofoten winter.

Bjørn J

stever

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2012, 11:23:47 PM »

Bjorn - better in winter than i imagined
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Petrus

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2012, 01:07:53 AM »

All of the villages and towns north of Lyngseidet were burned to the ground in late 1944/early 1945 as the German army retreated before the Russian advance, so Lyngseidet was incredibly lucky. 


Russians never entered the Norwegian soil, we kept them at bay two countries away...

I have been around those parts a few times, and there certainly is a lot to photograph. Amazing light in the summer 24 hours a day, amazing no-light in winter with graphic snow and opens sea. Take a lot of hard disk space with you!
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Bjørn J

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2012, 06:30:38 AM »

Bjorn, the images on your site art stunning! How fortunate you are to live in northern Norway!  Noticed some very wide angle shots that are particularly beautiful...I was wondering about your wide angle lens selections?  I am going to costal Norway next yeat and am trying to decide on lens selections. Any suggestions welcome and thanks! Eleanor


Thank you Eleanor. I mostly use the Nikkor 14-24mm/2,8, but some photos are taken with my old Nikkor Ai 16mm/3,5 rectangular fisheye, it's an incredible good lens.
I will gladly give you some advice about locations in Lofoten (and northern Norway in general) if you wish, I know these parts of Norway well.

Bjørn J
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Bjørn Jørgensen
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Bjørn J

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2012, 06:40:41 AM »

Russians never entered the Norwegian soil, we kept them at bay two countries away...


Actually they did. In October 1944 russian soldiers entered Norway, and the German soldiers retreated, burning most of Finnmark county on their way south. The Russians withdraw from Norway in 1945.
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Petrus

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2012, 10:21:52 AM »

Actually they did. In October 1944 russian soldiers entered Norway, and the German soldiers retreated, burning most of Finnmark county on their way south. The Russians withdraw from Norway in 1945.

I stand corrected. How far west did they get? Alta?
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Bjørn J

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Re: Lofoten, Norway
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2012, 11:01:14 AM »

I stand corrected. How far west did they get? Alta?
No, they stopped when they reached the river Tana, about 100 km from the Russian border.
But this is war history, and very off topic :-)
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Bjørn Jørgensen
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