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Author Topic: Wet Colodium shooting  (Read 8872 times)

julienlanoo

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Wet Colodium shooting
« on: January 23, 2012, 05:33:07 AM »

Hi guys,

So i've bought every thing, from camera, to studio props, to make a turn of the 'previous century' photo studio...

No i want to shoot with wet colodium,
any tips/ideas where i could find the chemicals en recepies to make wet colodium ?.. and silver nitrate etc etc..?


greets
ju
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Tim Gray

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Re: Wet Colodium shooting
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2012, 03:03:29 PM »

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Deardorff

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Re: Wet Colodium shooting
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2012, 07:40:37 AM »

http://studioq.com/

Quinn Jacobson is a good starting place as his book on the process is well done and easy to understand.  He also does workshops.

http://www.johncoffer.com/   

John is an interesting character and if you want Collodian the way it 'used to be' visiting him and even the site is a good experience.

http://www.collodion.org/

Scully and Osterman are very good. A trip through history while learning.

Best of luck and don't forget to put the cyanide in a completely different container than everthing else - especially the containers you use for drinks. We lost some photogs through the years as they woke up in the night and grabbed the bottle of cyanide instead of the bottle of beer...
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galactic.surfeur

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Re: Wet Colodium shooting
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2012, 01:23:21 AM »

 also http://www.collodion.com (sponsored by Quinn Jacobson). Excellent forum with collodion's specialist.

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Deardorff

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Re: Wet Colodium shooting
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2012, 11:27:34 AM »

One thing that will help a lot is to suck it up, spend the money and take a workshop from Quinn, the Ostermans or similar.

It will save you more in lost time and materials than the cost of the workshop.

You get to see the work in progress as well as pour and shoot your own plates.

I recommend Quinns workshop, from experience. Easy to understand, small group of 4 or fewer and a lot of hands on 'doing the process' so you come away with 1 to a dozen finished glass plates.

Take a workshop if you can possibly fit it in.
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