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Author Topic: Workflow in RAW  (Read 5970 times)

Edalongthepacific

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Workflow in RAW
« on: January 11, 2012, 10:58:30 PM »

I found myself using Vibrance in Camera Raw CS5 but then removing an undesirable color cast by using the White Balance eyedropper. This seems to be "improper" but gave me better tone and better vibrance. Am I mad?
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stamper

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Re: Workflow in RAW
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2012, 05:08:05 AM »

If you aren't mad then why are you posting here? :) The order and the way you use it isn't set in stone and there isn't a particular order that you have to use it. If it looks good then why not? :)

RFPhotography

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Re: Workflow in RAW
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2012, 07:58:51 AM »

I generally consider the order the controls are placed an indication of the order of operations.  That is, get the WB straight first so that you can really get a handle on colour, then start working on colour and contrast.
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stamper

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Re: Workflow in RAW
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2012, 08:10:10 AM »

Colour and contrast can change the WB?

Les Sparks

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Re: Workflow in RAW
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2012, 10:35:26 AM »

You're not mad.

I find that the whole editing process in iterative. Get WB, exposure, contract OK. Then change something and then tweak WB, Exposre, or whatever to get the image looking better. Every change, even a local change, has the possibility of affecting the way the whole image looks. So tweaking things that you set earlier is often necessary. The whole idea is to get the best image possible.

Les

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Raw shooter

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Re: Workflow in RAW
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2012, 11:44:49 AM »

I generally consider the order the controls are placed an indication of the order of operations.  That is, get the WB straight first so that you can really get a handle on colour, then start working on colour and contrast.
Agree, maybe white balance first - then see if anything else is needed.  Shooting raw files I presume.
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Peter_DL

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Re: Workflow in RAW
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2012, 12:16:23 PM »

I found myself using Vibrance in Camera Raw CS5 but then removing an undesirable color cast by using the White Balance eyedropper. This seems to be "improper" but gave me better tone and better vibrance. Am I mad?

Increasing vibrance / saturation can anytime amplify color casts from an inherent "wrong" white balance.

__
« Last Edit: January 14, 2012, 12:22:02 PM by Peter_DL »
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Walter Schulz

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Re: Workflow in RAW
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2012, 04:46:17 AM »

Hue twists are unavoidable using the camera profiles provided by Adobe. This issue was discussed in length and depth years ago. Follow http://dcptool.sourceforge.net/Hue%20Twists.html and take a look at the links. As said there: It's indended to work this way and for some reason.
Untwisted profiles are available but may not suit your needs.

"There ainít no such thing as a free lunch" comes to mind and I agree with Les Sparks.

Ciao, Walter
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Tim Lookingbill

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Re: Workflow in RAW
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2012, 12:54:04 PM »

Hue twists are unavoidable using the camera profiles provided by Adobe. This issue was discussed in length and depth years ago. Follow http://dcptool.sourceforge.net/Hue%20Twists.html and take a look at the links. As said there: It's indended to work this way and for some reason.
Untwisted profiles are available but may not suit your needs.

"There ainít no such thing as a free lunch" comes to mind and I agree with Les Sparks.

Ciao, Walter

And the hue twist can be easily corrected for by just remapping the highlights by reshaping the point curve toward either a flattened or arched tweak in the region the hue twist occurs. I've done it countless of times. I've never had an issue with hue twists using Recovery or any other dynamic range expanding tool tweak.

What amazes and pleasantly surprises me is the use of Adobe Standard Beta profile in miraculously fixing hue errors (i.e. overly saturated pinky orange highlights in sunset clouds or overly greenish yellow tungsten next to daylight pinky blue white walls). That profile neutralizes the entire tonal scale of the image while toning down overly saturated cobalt blue skies and over exaggerated cool/warm effects. But I do have to increase green tint WB slider.

Adobe's engineers are doing something to the color tables in the image with Adobe Standard Beta I can't pull off with a custom profile. At least this is what I surmise editing Pentax PEF's from my K100D DSLR. I don't know if this happens with other camera brand's Raw files.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2012, 01:02:43 PM by tlooknbill »
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stamper

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Re: Workflow in RAW
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2012, 03:44:59 AM »

Colour and contrast can change the WB?






















Yes.
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