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Author Topic: upper antelope canyon  (Read 4211 times)

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upper antelope canyon
« on: November 04, 2003, 07:04:45 AM »

The dynamic range in AC is so great that no film or sensor can capture it. As with any such situation the best approach is to avoid burning out the highlights. Expose for the highlights and let the shadows fall where they may.

You can also try some of the digital belending or shadow recovery techniques detailedon this site.

Bring a large clear plastic grabage bag or two to cover your camrra gear. There can be a contant "rain" of sand from the top of the canyon above if it's windy.

Michael
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mpross

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upper antelope canyon
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2003, 10:36:06 AM »

jeffreybehr
Loved your Colorado and Antelope Canyon pics. I am thinking of taking a trip out that way in March. Especially Antelope Canyon.

Matt
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Eric

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upper antelope canyon
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2003, 10:06:01 PM »

upper antelope canyon

i'm shooting negative color and b/w film with pentax 67 medium format camera @ 11:30 to 1:30.

recommendations on exposure time/how to set meter on the sandstone.

any help would be great

eric
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jeffreybehr

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upper antelope canyon
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2003, 02:30:12 PM »

Michael is absolutely right about dynamic range and the 'raining' sand.  I'll add the old truism to avoid any sky in your pics--usually it's so bright, everything else will be virtually black.  I now use Fred Miranda's Dynamic Range Increase (DRI) action; best $8.50 I ever spent.

Do enjoy your shoot, Eric; I always have; see My Colorado Plateau album .
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