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Author Topic: Tree trouble  (Read 5057 times)

sdwilsonsct

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Tree trouble
« on: November 25, 2011, 01:17:35 PM »

Any suggestions for dealing with the wispy trees in the upper right?
Scott

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2011, 01:47:36 PM »

What seems to be the problem that needs dealing with?

Rob C

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2011, 01:48:12 PM »

No problem at all: just title the picture Early Gale.

Rob C

sdwilsonsct

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2011, 02:50:23 PM »

Thanks, guys. These are lovely, thin birches. But the individuals on the right bother me because their leaves look like they're hovering near the trees instead of being attached to them.
Scott

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2011, 03:05:17 PM »

... leaves look like they're hovering near the trees instead of being attached to them.

None of which is visible at the published size. Perhaps a 100% crop of the area might help?

But I do see, even at this size, chromatic aberration in the branches.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2011, 03:06:54 PM by Slobodan Blagojevic »
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Rob C

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2011, 03:49:54 PM »

But I do see, even at this size, chromatic aberration in the branches.


Aha! Just like in Predator, then?

Rob C

sdwilsonsct

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2011, 04:23:05 PM »

chromatic aberration in the branches.

...as in a colour fringe? I don't see this, perhaps your monitor is better than mine. :)

Caused by the lens or processing? Or Rob C's suggestion?
Scott

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2011, 05:00:18 PM »

Yes, red-cyan color fringe, caused by the lens/sensor.

sdwilsonsct

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2011, 05:17:10 PM »

Thanks, Slobodan. If we're looking at the same thing, I believe the colour is clouds behind the troublesome trees.
Scott

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2011, 06:11:48 PM »

Well, since you do not want to provide a 100% crop of the area, I have to provide one with a rather crude screen enlargement (click to enlarge and see my pointers).

I hope you see the fringing now. A characteristic of the fringing is that it appears red on one side of a high contrast area (i.e., twig) and cyan on the other. Color of the clouds would appear the same behind each twig.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 09:57:17 AM by Slobodan Blagojevic »
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sdwilsonsct

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2011, 08:06:22 PM »

OK - I'm seeing it now. Thanks very much for the illustration.
Is there a way to correct or avoid this?
Scott, learning lots

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2011, 09:01:22 PM »

It is an optical phenomenon and hard to avoid. Some digital cameras make it more pronounced as well. Most lenses/sensor combination exhibit it to some degree, some more some less, but it is relatively easy to correct in a raw processor. Most raw processors these days (e.g., Lightroom) have a function to remove chromatic aberration. Removing it would also contribute to a "crispier" appearance of the twigs.

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2011, 10:17:14 AM »

Just noticed you are using Aperture, not Lightroom. I was using it in its 1.x incarnations initially, but ditched it in favor of LR precisely because of the lack of a chromatic aberration tool. Do not know whether that has changed in later versions.

sdwilsonsct

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #13 on: November 26, 2011, 11:53:17 AM »

remove chromatic aberration. Removing it would also contribute to a "crispier" appearance of the twigs.

This is exactly the kind of help I'm looking for: thanks again. I agree that cleaning up the CA should crisp up the branches. The original files show an even greater spread of light and colour around the twigs. I'll look into addressing this soon and report back.

I imagine ED lenses would help, too. This was taken with Canon EF-S (non-L) lens.

Scott

Maurício Costa

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2011, 07:36:04 PM »

It is quite beautiful scene and you captured very well...
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mimisan

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2011, 09:41:28 PM »

Wow!!! That stream and the whole composition of this image is simply phenomenal. What were your camera settings?
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sdwilsonsct

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2011, 11:48:17 AM »

Thanks, iso and mimisan. This is three images aligned in Photomatix. f/22 for 1.3, 0.3 and 5 seconds. 10 mm focal length on a Canon 50D.
Following Slobodan's suggestion, I have reduced the chromatic aberration in the originals using Aperture 3 which has improved the definition of the branches.
Scott

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2011, 12:38:56 PM »

Any particular reason you shot at f/22?

The 10 mm lens is an ultra-wide angle, thus having plenty of apparent DOF way before f/22. In terms of sharpness, f/22 is probably the worst aperture you could have chosen. For a detailed discussion, see this thread.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2011, 12:44:31 PM by Slobodan Blagojevic »
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walter.sk

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2011, 01:17:03 PM »

Try playing with the type or amount of ghosting reduction in Photomatix, as well as other HDR programs you may have.  NIK's does a great job of ghost elimination that might work on your branches.
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sdwilsonsct

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Re: Tree trouble
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2011, 03:56:33 PM »

Any particular reason you shot at f/22?

Because I thought it would give me a large depth of field.  Apparently there is more to learn ;D ! I look forward to reading that thread.

Thanks for your suggestion, Walter.

Scott
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