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Author Topic: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II  (Read 117160 times)

jjj

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #100 on: February 20, 2013, 09:55:55 AM »

Of course they cited enjoyment as the key. What that survey shows is that ten percent of the buyers were honest.
And what your statement shows is that you will twist and manipulate any evidence to prove your world view/opinion is correct or simply ignore anything that you cannot mangle to your view.
There are other viewpoints you know. For example...

Why is it soooo difficult for some of you to accept that there are people who actually like the Rhein II (I do)?

You seem to go to great lengths looking for any other explanation, mostly cynical (investment) or derogatory (stupid rich). Some of you are patronizingly concerned with the longevity or reproducibility of the said piece. The people who pay 4+ millions for a photograph do not have net worth of 5 million, but more likely in the range of 50 to 500 million.
I also like Gursky's work and if I could afford a house big enough to display such work properly, then maybe I could afford his prices too.
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Rob C

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #101 on: February 20, 2013, 02:12:20 PM »

Neck straps are more interesting.

Actually, wearing one so that it passes behind the neck with the camera hanging down the front of you is not any safer or more comfortable.

Once you have your first heart attack you discover more interesting things about your neck as, for examle, the two arteries that run down both the sides, right where the strap likes to press itself. A little too much time so strapped up, and you can feel yourself faint quite away: almost as in a ladies' magazine article, but without the thrill.

Best to keep cameras in a case, the case left at home or in the studio. Or, in extremis, have it carried by/in the tender care of someone much younger and ignorant of the dangers that lurk therein.

As for the value of pictures - depends how much money and/or sense one has. Oh, taste: forgot about that. Let's just look at paintings, then.

Rob C

amolitor

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #102 on: February 20, 2013, 02:46:19 PM »

I think sometimes I am the only person in the world to go strapless. I carry the camera in my hand (well, cameras that are small enough to do so, I have a couple of tripod mounted things that mostly gather dust). This would be difficult, I guess, with a big (D)SLR but for the little Nikons I have it works perfectly well.

My leaving my neck clear, I expect to live forever!
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #103 on: February 20, 2013, 02:55:32 PM »

It seems that this thread has finally found its true calling, best expressed in two words: neck and hanging?

WalterEG

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #104 on: February 20, 2013, 03:00:04 PM »

Neckstrap-free-zone here.  Apart from anything else, there are no strap lugs that I can find on a Sinar.

Adding the tangle of a strap on my Fuji X-E 1 would defeat the purose of a grab-cam.

Cheers,

W
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #105 on: February 20, 2013, 09:19:57 PM »

It seems that this thread has finally found its true calling, best expressed in two words: neck and hanging?
Now if I ever saw Rhein II hanging from somebody's neck, I really would be impressed.
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amolitor

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #106 on: February 21, 2013, 09:12:38 AM »

The Rhine of the Ancient Mariner..
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RSL

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #107 on: February 21, 2013, 09:14:31 AM »

Now if I ever saw Rhein II hanging from somebody's neck, I really would be impressed.


Better on a T-shirt.

Rob C

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #108 on: February 21, 2013, 12:42:24 PM »

The Rhine of the Ancient Mariner..




Back to Fleetwood Mac and his big bad bird.

Rob C

Ray

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #109 on: February 21, 2013, 07:26:40 PM »

Now you have to understand that I have an 83-year-old neck, so I've done a couple things to keep the weight off of it.

Hi Russ,
I didn't realise you were that old. At 70, I'm just a youngster compared with you.  ;D

Replacing the 70-200/F2.8 with the lighter 70-200/F4 is a move in the right direction, but that D3 is a heavy beast. I recall holding just the camera body in my hand at a photographic exhibition a few years ago, shortly after the camera was first released, and felt immediately that it was noticeably heavier than any of my other cameras. The weight alone put me off, regardless of the price.

I think you should consider replacing that burdensome D3 with Nikon's newest upcoming camera, the 24mp D7100. This camera with zoom lens attached might weigh no more than the D3 body, and the technical performance at base ISO will probably exceed that of the D3 in every department, DR, SNR, Tonal Range, resolution etc.

Regards
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Rob C

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #110 on: February 22, 2013, 04:39:19 AM »

Surely, Ray, you don't subscribe to the notion that it's the camera that makes the difference? Or the neck?

Rob C

Ray

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #111 on: February 22, 2013, 08:46:46 AM »

Surely, Ray, you don't subscribe to the notion that it's the camera that makes the difference? Or the neck?

Rob C

What difference are you referring to, Rob?
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RSL

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #112 on: February 22, 2013, 03:01:27 PM »

Thanks Ray. Good advice I'm sure. I did switch to a D800 for a lot of my work, but I still love my D3 for certain things. Early next month I'll shoot the dress rehearsal for a play. I shot a rehearsal with the D800 in December since my D3 was at Nikon for repair, and the weight of several hundred 36.3 megapixel files was pretty intimidating. The D3 returned nicely CLAed but with its autofocus problem unfixed and I had to send it back. I'm hoping it'll show up again before the next shoot. I do love the D800. ISO range is about the same as with the D3, but dynamic range and color accuracy are noticeably better. Of course, resolution is improved too. On the other hand though I have pretty powerful computers it takes a long time to plow through that many pixels.

Rob C

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #113 on: February 22, 2013, 03:15:35 PM »

What difference are you referring to, Rob?



Of the resulting pictures?

Rob C

Ray

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #114 on: February 22, 2013, 10:20:36 PM »

I did switch to a D800 for a lot of my work, but I still love my D3 for certain things. Early next month I'll shoot the dress rehearsal for a play. I shot a rehearsal with the D800 in December since my D3 was at Nikon for repair, and the weight of several hundred 36.3 megapixel files was pretty intimidating.

Hi Russ,
I also use a D800E. I thought it might be the last camera I'd buy because it has the same pixel density as my other cropped-format Nikon, the D7000, and therefore serves the same purpose as that camera, in addition to its wider angle of view that the full-frame sensor provides. In effect, it seemed like I was getting two cameras for the price of one.

However, on my last photographic trip, carrying just my D800E and a couple of zoom lenses, I found it very frustrating having to continually change lenses, especially when I was clambering over and trying to balance on fallen stone slabs in temple ruins in the Cambodian jungle.

For this reason, I'm going back to carrying two cameras with lenses attached, despite the extra weight. I guess I'll just have to take up weight-lifting to keep up my strength.  ;D

Whilst the old D7000 has no image-quality advantage if one is using the D800, the new D7100 does have the advantage of higher resolution and therefore provides effectively a longer reach with the same lens.
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Ray

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #115 on: February 22, 2013, 10:27:33 PM »



Of the resulting pictures?

Rob C

Hi Rob,
Cameras can make a big difference to the resulting picture. Didn't you know that?  ;D

For example, if you don't have a camera, you can't take a photograph at all, so no resulting picture, zilch, nada, unless you take up painting of course.

If you do have a camera, but it's a Brownie Box camera, or an iPhone camera, you might still be able to take worthwhile pictures which may be more interesting, and considered by some to be more artistic, than certain other images taken by other photographers using multi-thousand dollar MFDBs. When it comes to artistic matters, everything is a matter of opinion.

However, I doubt that Gursky's Rhein II, at its humongous size of 8ft x 12ft, would have sold for $4.7 million if it had been taken with the average iPhone. However, the 40mp, Nokia PureView 808 could probably have done the job, thus demonstrating that there is a difference between a very small 5mp sensor and a significantly larger 40mp sensor.  ;D
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Rob C

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #116 on: February 23, 2013, 10:13:35 AM »

Hi Rob,
Cameras can make a big difference to the resulting picture. Didn't you know that?  ;D

For example, if you don't have a camera, you can't take a photograph at all, so no resulting picture, zilch, nada, unless you take up painting of course.






Dear me, Ray that’s so reactionary!

You are missing the entire point of photography, which is fundamentally nothing more than vehicle to a sublime emotional experience. Or, you may just be signalling the early stages of photographic competence, and so I shan’t offer any seriously critical comment here, other than to let you know that the best, for you, is yet to come.

Snapping’s like fishing (obviously) and you will one day discover that the very best snaps are the ones that you simply didn’t make for the fundamental reason that you were so wrapped in the moment (even, sometimes, decisively so) that the distraction of finger on button would have absolutely removed the thin, evanescent patina of magic, that quasi-erotic sense of oneness with the creation before your eyes, that not making the shot actually allowed you to preserve within the eternity of your inner consciousness.

Similar to fishing, as I said, but with the advantage that you never, ever have to stand there, legs apart and arms stretched out in undignified boastful measure.

Less is sometimes more, but nothing is perfection. As I’m sure you now agree.

Don‘t become disheartened, though, there’s time enough yet.

So, Ray, I find myself having to suggest that your thoughful contention about the relative values of having or not having a camera to hand at any one moment of possible photographic moment doesn’t, in fact, hold at all: the better experiences, those rare (very) happenings that transcend the mundane are all best experienced without mecha-electro distractions in hand. Just like the fish, as I said when I came in.

Someone remarked somewhere else about the strange habits of some LuLa members; you know, like not sticking to finely defined lines of demarcation (lines of demarcation are usually finely defined) such as lenses only to be mentioned within the context of a lens thread, cameras only in camera threads, and so forth. I can’t say that I have ever found this rule to have been violated within the illuminated (and illuminating) pages of this fine journal, have you? As for allegations of personal attack! Goodness me, perish the thought that such ungentlemanly behaviour would be tollerated by the establishment, the writing hierarchy of this club for seniors!

Bless you, my son; the planets will soon align, Kodachrome will return.

Rob C

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #117 on: February 23, 2013, 10:45:05 AM »

That's why I am on LuLa!

Ray

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #118 on: February 23, 2013, 07:40:57 PM »


You are missing the entire point of photography, which is fundamentally nothing more than vehicle to a sublime emotional experience.


Vehicles can make a difference, Rob, especially when trying to capture the sublime emotional experience of crossing the Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia.

Without the right type of vehicle you woulkd likely get stuck. In an area without mobile phone coverage, you might die.
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BernardLanguillier

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Re: Andreas Gursky's Rhein II
« Reply #119 on: February 23, 2013, 09:36:36 PM »

Snapping’s like fishing (obviously) and you will one day discover that the very best snaps are the ones that you simply didn’t make for the fundamental reason that you were so wrapped in the moment (even, sometimes, decisively so) that the distraction of finger on button would have absolutely removed the thin, evanescent patina of magic, that quasi-erotic sense of oneness with the creation before your eyes, that not making the shot actually allowed you to preserve within the eternity of your inner consciousness.

Rob,

This is your best post ever.

The most amazing thing is that we don't really need a camera not to take the shot. It ends up being a call for simply seeing. The implications of your fishing analogy are so profound that I'll spend my whole NRT-BKK flight playing with it without touching a camera!

Cheers,
Bernard
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