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Author Topic: Sony NEX-7 review  (Read 21620 times)
Vidgamer
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« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2011, 09:46:55 AM »
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I am truly impressed with the product and what Michael mentioned a while back, about the convergence of stills/video in a product, has now appeared with no discernible weakness.  I was not too impressed with the older NEX5 (even the video being 1080i) and sold off my NEX5 and the 2 kit lenses, a couple of months after purchase - the interface and the lack of a viewfinder being the culprits.  

Technically, the video in the Nex-5 is 1080p30... stored in a 1080i wrapper.  Since a lot of people want 24p video, this is at least not far from that. The problem was lack of control over some of the settings during video (particularly to control shutter speed).  In a later firmware update, you could at least control the aperture.

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The only weaknesses that I see in the NEX7, are the lack of in-body stabilization (one of the really small Olympus models has it, and thus body size should not be the limitation), lack of a fully swiveling screen (the tilt screen does not satisfy me fully) like the Canon 60D, and also the exclusion of GPS from the product.  The exclusion of GPS is a bad move, especially since even low-end p&s products from Sony come with GPS.  The A77 and the A65 also come with GPS.  The HX100V also comes with GPS and surprising that they skipped GPS in a higher-end product like the NEX7.

GPS would be a nice feature, as would IBIS.  Some say that using in-lens stabilization is better for video.

Although, if I have to geotag my photos, I can probably use an iPhone/Geosetter combination.  Although the one time I tried this, it was really off.
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BarbaraArmstrong
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« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2011, 03:28:43 PM »
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I'd like to ask about the manual focusing on the NEX-7.  Particularly, I'd like a comparison with manual focusing on the Panasonic GH-2.  On the Panasonic, when I am in manual focusing mode, as soon as I touch the focusing ring, the image in the viewfinder/LCD screen is immediately magnified, making focusing rather easy, and (especially important on macro shots) allowing me to put the focus exactly where I want it.  So maybe Michael R. could respond based on the trial run in San Diego, or perhaps the answer is the same as for the existing Nex cameras and a current Nex user could describe it.  The comment in the review about increased contrast in the viewfinder didn't help me understand what's going on.  Is there any magnification of the portion of the image you want to optimize?  I've been very much enjoying my GH-2 as a camera I have with me almost everywhere, but a smaller body/lens with significantly higher image quality and at least comparable viewfinder quality would warrant a draw on the bank account.  --Barbara
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memento
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« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2011, 05:06:13 PM »
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Barbara,

see this Youtube video for how the "focus peaking" works on the Sony NEX:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q44dIt_gSK4

As you can see, this feature does NOT need you to focus into the image for focussing. But it only works in areas of the image where high contrast detail is present. Anyway, of course you can also zoom into the image to focus. I can't tell you if it switches on automatically whenever you touch the focus ring – as I, so far, don't have any autofocus lenses for the NEX. With manual lenses, you just press a button on the rear of the camera to switch to 7x and 14x magnification.

Thomas
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BarbaraArmstrong
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« Reply #23 on: September 26, 2011, 12:25:47 AM »
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Thomas, thanks for the answer and thanks for the link.  I was surprised to see the SX-70 -- I still have mine.  I was also surprised to see the Korean!  Good thing the visuals were enough!  Thanks again.  --Barbara
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #24 on: September 26, 2011, 01:11:52 AM »
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Hi,

On the A55 when you press the button a small marker is shown. That marker can be moved around. Pressing the button again magnifies 7.5 times and pressing it again goes 15X. I'd presume NEX-7 will be similar. It works well, but is quite slow.

Best regards
Erik


Barbara,

see this Youtube video for how the "focus peaking" works on the Sony NEX:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q44dIt_gSK4

As you can see, this feature does NOT need you to focus into the image for focussing. But it only works in areas of the image where high contrast detail is present. Anyway, of course you can also zoom into the image to focus. I can't tell you if it switches on automatically whenever you touch the focus ring – as I, so far, don't have any autofocus lenses for the NEX. With manual lenses, you just press a button on the rear of the camera to switch to 7x and 14x magnification.

Thomas
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BarbaraArmstrong
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« Reply #25 on: September 26, 2011, 01:59:44 AM »
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Erikl, thanks for the additional feedback.
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Dave Gurtcheff
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« Reply #26 on: September 26, 2011, 10:55:48 AM »
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I have never used an electronic viewfinder. Can you see the effect of a polarizer, or grad ND filters in the finder?
Thanks
Dave
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #27 on: September 26, 2011, 12:01:00 PM »
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Hi,

Yes, you see the actual sensor image.

Best regards
Erik

I have never used an electronic viewfinder. Can you see the effect of a polarizer, or grad ND filters in the finder?
Thanks
Dave
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Dave Gurtcheff
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« Reply #28 on: September 26, 2011, 02:43:29 PM »
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Thank you Erik.
Dave

Hi,

Yes, you see the actual sensor image.

Best regards
Erik

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allegretto
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« Reply #29 on: October 03, 2011, 04:57:59 PM »
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I too am intrigued by Sony's latest. But I approached it from a different direction.

Am going with an A77 body first. Weather-sealed, in-camera stabilization and Zeiss-ready make it very attractive. Sort of wavered between the 65 and 77, but the 77 isn't really much larger and seems more robust. If the system does as well as they claim, I'll get a NEX-7 (or 9) as a second body. Right now their pancake offerings are not attractive to me, and the good looking zooms in their line appear as though they might make the 7 imbalanced and certainly pocketable only in a baggy pocket.

But hey, as long as it's fun...
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #30 on: October 04, 2011, 10:43:07 AM »
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As you can see, this feature does NOT need you to focus into the image for focussing. But it only works in areas of the image where high contrast detail is present.

This is correct, and needs to be emphasized as a cautionary note to those using focus peaking.  Under certain situations, like if your image has any areas that are naturally high in contrast, focus peaking can be fooled by these areas of high contrast.  There is an edge detection algorithm in the software, and that's what you are seeing when you get the highlights on the EVF.  I have found in a few limited situations, that I get an image that is not totally sharp (in focus) due to a scene that is naturally high in contrast.  It doesn't happen very often, but it does happen.
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memento
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« Reply #31 on: October 10, 2011, 05:58:46 PM »
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New full size samples are available here, showing the NEX-7 with all kinds of different NEX lenses:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sportsphotorob/with/6231485889/

To be honest, I am beginning to feel a bit underwhelmed by what I see. I don't really care about all those zoom lenses, but even the images with the Zeiss 24/1.8 at f/2.8 are showing several unsharp areas, and generally the detail rendition is way too smudgy everywhere. For this kind of performance, one would really not need a 24 megapixel body.

Or are these all still issues with preproduction firmware, incorrect JPG settings or the like?

Thomas
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adanac
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« Reply #32 on: October 10, 2011, 06:55:36 PM »
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Related, the Zeiss 24mm f/1.8 is being reported by Sony (.ca) as having a delayed ship date - now January 13, 2012, set back from December. I don't know if that affects folks who ordered much earlier (stock related) or has to do with production delays, affecting all.
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Jeff Kott
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« Reply #33 on: October 12, 2011, 04:16:25 PM »
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This is correct, and needs to be emphasized as a cautionary note to those using focus peaking.  Under certain situations, like if your image has any areas that are naturally high in contrast, focus peaking can be fooled by these areas of high contrast.  There is an edge detection algorithm in the software, and that's what you are seeing when you get the highlights on the EVF.  I have found in a few limited situations, that I get an image that is not totally sharp (in focus) due to a scene that is naturally high in contrast.  It doesn't happen very often, but it does happen.

I've been using my new NEX 5N and EVF for about a month now with a ZM 35/2.8 and CV 75/2.5. I have never had such a high percentage of in focus shots as with the NEX. I would say that manual focusing with my D300 (and Katz Eye split prism screen) and comparable lenses ( I have a ZF 35/2 and CV 75/2.5 SL I) I achieve critical focus on about 70-80% of my shots. With the NEX, I am above 90%, possibly 95%.

I use focus peaking at normal view for a rough cut and then zoom in 5x or 10x to complete focus. I typically stop the aperture down to my shooting aperture before I focus because I find it quicker and there is less camera movement after I focus.

So, I agree. Focus peaking is not a 100% solution, but focus peaking plus magnified view is at least a 95% solution for me.
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Dave Gurtcheff
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« Reply #34 on: October 17, 2011, 08:02:51 AM »
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I have preordered the NEX 7. I also have a A900 and numerous A mount lenses. I note there are two adapters: the LA-EA1, and LA-EA2. I do not intend to use the camera for video, so is there any advantage to the more expensive LA-EA2?
Thanks in advance
Dave
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #35 on: October 17, 2011, 08:18:45 AM »
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The more expensive adapter has AF with Alha AF lenses using SLT technology.

BR Erik

I have preordered the NEX 7. I also have a A900 and numerous A mount lenses. I note there are two adapters: the LA-EA1, and LA-EA2. I do not intend to use the camera for video, so is there any advantage to the more expensive LA-EA2?
Thanks in advance
Dave
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Dave Gurtcheff
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« Reply #36 on: October 17, 2011, 10:26:53 AM »
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The more expensive adapter has AF with Alha AF lenses using SLT technology.

BR Erik

Thanks Erik. Does the older adapter allow auto focus with Alpha & Minolta AF lenses as well (albeit maybe slower?)
Dave
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michael
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« Reply #37 on: October 17, 2011, 11:07:41 AM »
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The EA1 allows autofocus using the NEX camera's contrast detection. It's slow with A mount lenses because they weren't designed for it.

The EA2 uses the complete phase detection autofocus system as found in the A65 and A77 cameras, and is very fast. SSM lenses are the fastest, SAM next, and older screww thread the slowest - though still now worse than on an Alpha camera.

I have the new EA2 and am using it on a NEX-5n, and will be reporting on it here soon.

Michael
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urbanpicasso
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« Reply #38 on: October 17, 2011, 11:54:48 AM »
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"I have the new EA2 and am using it on a NEX-5n, and will be reporting on it here soon."

That's great to hear. I've been interested in whether the mirror or the possibility of a thicker AA filter has an effect, if any, on slight image  differences between sensors used on NEX vs Alpha APSC slrs. Most, 99%, of my work is static. I've been on the fence between the Nex 7 and the A77 as well as the LE-AE1 vs LE-AE2. I have a stable of Alpha lenses, to compliment my A900, that I was hoping to use while waiting for a full frame upgrade. Slow auto focus is not a big deal as I would often use the zoom live view/ peaking for critical focus.

david
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #39 on: October 17, 2011, 12:33:29 PM »
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Thanks Erik. Does the older adapter allow auto focus with Alpha & Minolta AF lenses as well (albeit maybe slower?)

The la-ea1 will only autofocus Alpha mount lenses that have a built in focus motor.  Here is the list of Alpha Lenses with SAM or SSM:
Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 24mm f/2 ZA SSM (36 mm - equivalent focal length on the NEX)
CZ Vario-Sonnar® T* 16-35 mm f2.8 Zoom SSM (24 - 52.5 mm)
CZ Vario-Sonnar® T* 24-70 mm f2.8 Zoom SSM (36 - 105 mm)
Sony Alpha 30mm f/2.8 Macro Lens SAM (45mm)
SA 35 mm f/1.8 SAM (52.5 mm)
SA 50 mm f/1.8 SAM (75 mm)
SA 85 mm f/2.8 SAM (127.5 mm)
SA 300 mm f/2.8 G SSM (450 mm)
SA DT 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6 Zoom Lens SAM (27 - 82.5 mm)
SA 28-75 mm f/2.8 Zoom Lens SAM (42 - 112.5 mm)
SA 55-200 mm f/4-5.6 Zoom Lens SAM (82.5 - 300 mm)
SA 70-200mm f/2.8 G SSM (105 - 300 mm)
SA 70-300 mm f/4-5.6 G Zoom Lens SSM (105 - 450 mm)
SA 70-400 mm f/4-5.6 G Zoom Lens SSM (105 - 600 mm)

Certain Sigma lenses with HSM will also work, but the results have been sporadic.  My Sigma 70-200 F/2.8 works on my NEX-5 with the la-ea1. 

However, with the peaking feature, MF is so easy, it's almost faster to focus that way than to wait on the slower CD-AF...
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