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Author Topic: Over critical  (Read 6285 times)

stamper

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #20 on: March 07, 2011, 10:53:04 AM »

Forget ruminating self cricism.  Work that sells is good.  Work that doesn't sell is beside the point.  No other form of criticism is needed.  One's creative muse is best validated by the extent to which it successfully excites other people, for which there is no better truth-test than a credit card swipe.  The transfer of excitement is art enough for me.

Yes I know those are loutish words.  But I've been a lot happier since I have adopted that viewpoint, partly because it results in increased sales and more time to do photography.

It looks as if you are more interested in money than photography? :)

Justan

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2011, 11:39:43 AM »

FWIW, you would help yourself by listening to his comments. He has clearly and repeatedly demonstrated more of what it takes to be successful than anyone else you are likely to encounter.

That aside, nothing succeeds like a successful approach.

If you think you are being overly critical of your photography or anything else for that matter, either go to therapist and spend hours of self-indulgent time to explore why self-loathing is important to you, bleat on the web, or be direct and try doing things differently, such as emulating what those who have been successful have done. The willingness to try is everything, but the choice is yours.  ;)

stamper

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2011, 11:55:03 AM »

FWIW, you would help yourself by listening to his comments. He has clearly and repeatedly demonstrated more of what it takes to be successful than anyone else you are likely to encounter.

That aside, nothing succeeds like a successful approach.

If you think you are being overly critical of your photography or anything else for that matter, either go to therapist and spend hours of self-indulgent time to explore why self-loathing is important to you, bleat on the web, or be direct and try doing things differently, such as emulating what those who have been successful have done. The willingness to try is everything, but the choice is yours.  ;)

What I won't be doing is taking advice from an insulting JERK like yourself. I don't sell images or do I have any self loathing nor do I bleat. I don't need a therapist either. My original post was about my endeavours to improve. I suggest if this is the best manner in which you can answer posts then possibly a shrink can help you? ;D

bill t.

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2011, 02:23:18 PM »

Sorry for the fuss, I opened the wrong door and didn't realize where I was.
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stamper

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2011, 02:31:04 PM »

Sorry for the fuss, I opened the wrong door and didn't realize where I was.

I don't know why you have to apologize. You stated what you felt was right? I replied in jest.  :) Unfortunately someone else jumped into your defence with remarks that weren't - imo - appropriate.  >:(

Justan

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #25 on: March 07, 2011, 02:36:38 PM »

What I won't be doing is taking advice from an insulting JERK like yourself. I don't sell images or do I have any self loathing nor do I bleat. I don't need a therapist either. My original post was about my endeavours to improve. I suggest if this is the best manner in which you can answer posts then possibly a shrink can help you? ;D

You write a fine self-portrait  ;)

I'm going to try again:

Here is your original quote:

Does anyone find that they become over critical of their own work? I have been into photography for over ten years - a short time with respect to others - and I am striving to do better. One of the best bits of advice that I have read is to to be your own worst critic, which I have been practising. However recently I think I have got to the stage where I like less and less of what I am capturing. I like about 2% or 3% of my efforts. Is it possible to reverse this process and be more laid back or is this a sign of me "progressing"?

Yes it is possible to reverse this process. Look at those whose work you admire and try to emulate it from a technical perspective. Abandon the "worst critic" perspective or don’t make it the first or most important thing.

If you really don’t like 97% of the work you are doing, as you stated, there is likely something beyond photography that is contributing to your perception of your work. . .

To put it in the words of a friend who is a people person, “People sometimes get themselves into a funk. They have to do something different to take them out of it.” 

That and pay attention to what Bill writes.... ;)
« Last Edit: March 07, 2011, 05:52:19 PM by Justan »
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William Walker

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #26 on: March 08, 2011, 04:29:03 AM »

What I won't be doing is taking advice from an insulting JERK like yourself. I don't sell images or do I have any self loathing nor do I bleat. I don't need a therapist either. My original post was about my endeavours to improve. I suggest if this is the best manner in which you can answer posts then possibly a shrink can help you? ;D

Hey stamper! I agree, you may may not need a therapist, however, can I suggest an Anger Management Specialist? I know the ideal person, http://www.casproduction.com/siteportfolio/pamelaconnolly/. If she could help Billy, then I'm sure she'll be able to do the same for a fellow Glaswegian. ;)

William Walker

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #28 on: March 08, 2011, 04:35:01 AM »

BTW I am not a fellow Glaswegian I hail from bonny Dumbarton. :)

Close enough when you're 8000 miles away!

Rob C

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #29 on: March 08, 2011, 10:29:43 AM »

I don't think I am in need of anger management. I think my reply was justified. To state that I had self loathing was insulting. BTW I am not a fellow Glaswegian I hail from bonny Dumbarton. :)




Ooops! Sorry, stamper, I had thought you were from Glesca! (I may be mistaken with the patois - my kids laughed if I dared try to put it on - spelling it is even more demanding for me.)

Ciao -

Rob C

EduPerez

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2011, 02:58:02 AM »

Glad to know I am not the only one who got bitten by this bug: I recently did a trip to a nearby city, a full day for myself to wander about in a very photogenic city, and plenty of time to take lots of shots; back at home, I deleted all but one of them...

However, my problem is not being over critical while editing; what worries me is when I am too critical while shooting, because then I start not shooting at all, and cannot stop thinking I am loosing many good opportunities.
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John R Smith

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2011, 03:07:49 AM »

I believe that Ansel once said that if he got one really fine photograph a month, he felt he was doing well. So if you calculate the time that you feel you have left to you, shall we say ten years, then you might get another 120 really fine frames. Well, how many superb pictures do you need, for heaven's sake? I think 120 would be enough to leave to posterity. How many great photos can you call to mind (quickly, mind you, and no cheating looking in books) of Weston, or Adams, or HCB, or Brandt, or whoever - a dozen or so, perhaps. This is not something to agonise over. Most visual artists have drawers or portfolios full of stuff which did not make the grade, as well.

John
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Rob C

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Re: Over critical
« Reply #33 on: March 10, 2011, 04:50:16 PM »

Glad to know I am not the only one who got bitten by this bug: I recently did a trip to a nearby city, a full day for myself to wander about in a very photogenic city, and plenty of time to take lots of shots; back at home, I deleted all but one of them...

However, my problem is not being over critical while editing; what worries me is when I am too critical while shooting, because then I start not shooting at all, and cannot stop thinking I am loosing many good opportunities.



It depends on the subject type: some things happen quickly and you have to try and keep up with the pace; others are already dead and you can take your time both with shooting and considering. In the end, I think it's probably best to shoot less of the second type of thing, because it saves a lot of computer time. Unless, of course, computers are the real attraction, which I'm sure some find them to be.

I dislike computers and using them, but nowadays, what else can one do? Even family seem to depend on them rather than the telephone... my wife would never use a computer but only the 'phone because, she said, she could tell immediately from the voice if things at the other end were really okay or not; writing masks a lot.

She was seldom wrong about anything. Sure miss her advice and personality judgements. I can never make them well and waste a lot of energy on wankers who don't merit five minutes. The world is full of them; I've lost my insulation.

Rob C
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