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Author Topic: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question  (Read 3791 times)

CarolynC

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SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« on: October 07, 2010, 08:29:05 PM »

I'm confused.  I got my new NEW PA2471 monitor and am in the process of calibrating with SpectraView II.  95% of the time, I want to view my images on this new monitor in Adobe RGB since I'll be printing with Adobe RGB, which I know this monitor displays.  My confusion comes in when I go to my monitors menu and click on the RGB icon.  There are 5 numbers listed... 1 2 3 4 5.  #5 says "SpectraView II"  #1 says Adobe RGB.  When I have a calibration selected for this monitor via Spectraview, am I viewing my images in Adobe RGB even though #5 is selected and not #1?  I wonder because #1 says Adobe RGB, making me think I need to have #1 selected instead in order to view my images in Adobe RGB.  Can someone please clear this up for me?
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TimBarker

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2010, 06:13:22 AM »

As I understand it (and I've only had my PA271 for about as long as yourself so I may be talking complete rubbish) the "inbuilt factory set" Adobe RGB setting is the first one on the list and when you use Spectraview II to calibrate the screen it then puts the "calibrated" Adobe RGB into setting #5 leaving the factory settings intact.  At least that is what I think happens and I'm still learning how to use both the screen and the calibration software.
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Tim Barker (aka MandoTiM in other forums),
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CarolynC

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2010, 07:22:12 AM »

As I understand it (and I've only had my PA271 for about as long as yourself so I may be talking complete rubbish) the "inbuilt factory set" Adobe RGB setting is the first one on the list and when you use Spectraview II to calibrate the screen it then puts the "calibrated" Adobe RGB into setting #5 leaving the factory settings intact.  At least that is what I think happens and I'm still learning how to use both the screen and the calibration software.

Oh, ok.  Thank you for replying and sharing your understanding of how this works.  Sounds like you're right and I'm going to assume you are.  If anyone wants to second this, please let me know.
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shewhorn

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2010, 02:48:56 AM »

Check out Multi-Profiler as Roy suggested in your other thread:

http://www.necdisplay.com/MultiProfiler/downloads/
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CarolynC

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2010, 10:49:55 AM »

Check out Multi-Profiler as Roy suggested in your other thread:

http://www.necdisplay.com/MultiProfiler/downloads/

I don't really understand what Multi-Profiler is.  Can someone please explain what it's for?
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shewhorn

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2010, 11:43:02 AM »

I don't really understand what Multi-Profiler is.  Can someone please explain what it's for?

The PA series of monitors are extremely accurate, accurate enough (so they claim) that they do not need to be profiled as they've pain carefully characterized at the factory. The luminance is set in candellas for example and I believe the PA series is the first to actually do that. Using multi-profiler you can enter the settings you want and it will create that profile for you which it then uploads to the monitor's LUT. In theory the end results should be as good as if you had used a puck to profile the screen.

Cheers, Joe
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CarolynC

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2010, 12:54:11 PM »

The PA series of monitors are extremely accurate, accurate enough (so they claim) that they do not need to be profiled as they've pain carefully characterized at the factory. The luminance is set in candellas for example and I believe the PA series is the first to actually do that. Using multi-profiler you can enter the settings you want and it will create that profile for you which it then uploads to the monitor's LUT. In theory the end results should be as good as if you had used a puck to profile the screen.

Now that I've opened MultiProfiler, I'm confused.  How do I get it back to the factory calibration?  Am I supposed to choose Adobe RGB under Picture Mode or Full? 

Also, once you use MultiProfiler, does that mean I shouldn't even use SpectraView?  All of this is way over my head.   :(
« Last Edit: October 09, 2010, 01:25:19 PM by CarolynC »
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Rhossydd

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2010, 03:44:32 AM »

In theory the end results should be as good as if you had used a puck to profile the screen.
In practice, the results can be improved by proper calibration.
Whilst the basic Multisync is exceptionally good out of the box, they wouldn't offer a Spectraview variant of the panel if it couldn't be bettered.
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CarolynC

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2010, 04:55:47 AM »

In practice, the results can be improved by proper calibration.
Whilst the basic Multisync is exceptionally good out of the box, they wouldn't offer a Spectraview variant of the panel if it couldn't be bettered.

That's what I keep thinking...what's the point of SpectraView if you should never need to calibrate it?
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Rhossydd

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2010, 05:50:02 AM »

That's what I keep thinking...what's the point of SpectraView if you should never need to calibrate it?
I think there's a lot of salesmanship involved in the promotion of this panel. I can't see how they can compensate for changes to the output that will occur in the long term. There's already reports here that the panel's output changes over the first 500hrs of use and then become more stabilised.

Maybe there needs to be a more pragmatic approach and appreciation of this panel's outstanding qualities without unduly hyping it.
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Mark D Segal

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2010, 10:03:07 AM »

The reason why NEC offers a variant of this display with its own customized version of the i1 Display v.2 colorimeter (an XRite product) and Spectraview software is for owners to custom calibrate and profile the display. This assures the best possible performance NEC can offer for the individual panel and the customer's individual working environment. There is a huge literature on the benefits of creating custom display profiles, so I won't waste time here going into that. Anyone who needs to learn about it can do a search. The main problem with Spectraview II is that it can only make a matrix profile, not an LUT profile. The former assumes that the monitor's response is perfectly linear and therefore the much smaller matrix profile will be suitable. In fact, the displays are not necessarily perfectly linear and from my experience it is possible to get more accurate profiles by using the NEC-supplied colorimeter, but instead of Spectraview, I use BasicColor Display set to create LUT icc version 4 profiles for actually doing the calibration and building the profile. Like Spectraview, this software supports DDC for vastly simplifying the setting of the basic calibration conditions, and once the profile is built it loads that profile as the default. It works off the monitor LUT. To validate the profiles, I use Basic Color's internal validation function, but to improve upon that, I also use Babel Color PatchTool, which has more thorough potential for calculating dE values between the test's reference table values  and the values which PatchTool returns and reads from your display. This use of PatchTool is objective validation because it uses sets of patches different from the ones used in the profile creation software. Also, it can be more thorough if using patch test files having many more patches than included in the profiling software's validation tool.
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WombatHorror

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Re: SpectraView / Adobe RGB Question
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2010, 12:25:34 AM »

Now that I've opened MultiProfiler, I'm confused.  How do I get it back to the factory calibration?  Am I supposed to choose Adobe RGB under Picture Mode or Full? 

Also, once you use MultiProfiler, does that mean I shouldn't even use SpectraView?  All of this is way over my head.   :(

Just use the reset.

But honestly you don't want to be using or targeting it to ADobeRGB! That gamut has a few shades that the PA can't display and the PA has many shades that don't fit in AdobeRGB. For color-managed apps you should always target native gamut! It's just a waste to do otherwise. You gain nothing and definitely lose some.
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