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Author Topic: clos luce  (Read 2374 times)

kikashi

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clos luce
« on: August 15, 2010, 09:21:32 AM »

Does this work, or is it just too busy?

C&C welcome, as ever.

Jeremy
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Rob C

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2010, 09:55:21 AM »

Does this work, or is it just too busy?

C&C welcome, as ever.

Jeremy


Hi Jeremy

Yes, I think it works okay; after all, that's what the scene is, and not something you can alter without resorting to high explosives.

I think two things:

a. the camera may well be level, but the water gives the impression of being on a slope (I note the bridge's uprights are fine);

b. I assume this was digital, but perhaps film would have given better leaves, in the sense of definition.

Best -

Rob C

P.S. At last I can type below the box's original base level without losing sight of the text as I write; good for the tech man!

Lisa Nikodym

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2010, 10:49:42 AM »

It works.  It's not a masterpiece, but it's quite pretty, and it does what I think you want.  At least, I enjoy looking at it.  My one suggestion would be to crop or clone out the tree trunk leaning in on the upper left side, since it makes the image feel slightly claustrophobic.

But then, I tend to like "busy" images much more than simple ones.  I consider this to be a good level of "busy".  The scene *is* a "busy" one, and that's part of its charm.

Lisa

shutterpup

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2010, 12:02:09 PM »

I find the bridge itself and the reflections in the water very nice. All the greenery at the top of the photo where you're showing the origination of the reflections(I assume :-\)is just too busy for me.
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RSL

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2010, 12:21:41 PM »

I'll stick my oar in too: I like it. It's pretty and it's peaceful. It looks like it belongs on the grounds around the Fujiya hotel.

John R

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2010, 05:00:46 PM »

I really like the dappled light, which is restrained and inkeeping with whole of the ambient light. No harsh shadows. It makes an already beautiful scene more lively. It may seem somewhat busy, but the bridge and red flowers gives the image a cohesive and unified look. But I would like to suggest a crop, which is consistent with your overall image. I think it would look better with the left tree and right dark tree cropped out. Then you can crop and vary where you want your imaginary horizon, which presumably is near the bridge. And if you will permit, I can show you what I have in mind. I want to make it clear, it is a good image and most images can be cropped seven ways to Sunday. A very beautiful place!
« Last Edit: August 15, 2010, 05:03:33 PM by John R »
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kikashi

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2010, 05:52:57 PM »

I really like the dappled light, which is restrained and inkeeping with whole of the ambient light. No harsh shadows. It makes an already beautiful scene more lively. It may seem somewhat busy, but the bridge and red flowers gives the image a cohesive and unified look. But I would like to suggest a crop, which is consistent with your overall image. I think it would look better with the left tree and right dark tree cropped out. Then you can crop and vary where you want your imaginary horizon, which presumably is near the bridge. And if you will permit, I can show you what I have in mind. I want to make it clear, it is a good image and most images can be cropped seven ways to Sunday. A very beautiful place!
Of course I'll permit: that's partly why the image is here in the first place.

In fact, I took two sets of bracketed exposures of this scene. The other was taken in portrait: it has, therefore, more vertical and less horizontal capture. I looked at it but decided I liked the trees which bracketed the scene. One of the things which fascinates me about this forum is getting other people's opinions, so I returned to the portrait shot and fiddled with it a bit (removing that rather ugly pipe at the left of the underside of the bridge, for example, and cropping a bit off the top), giving the version attached to this post.

Comments?

Jeremy

By way of historical background, Clos LucÚ, in Amboise, was the house in which Leonardo da Vinci died. It's been very well restored by an American owner and has models and animated reconstructions of several of Leonardo's best-known designs (the helicopter, for example). I suspect the old man would have been fascinated by what we can now do!
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John R

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2010, 07:03:23 PM »

Well, your last vertical image is very good. It is no longer hemmed in or heavy on one side. The alternate white and dark trees on the right side balance nicely and are more like a visual resting point as the eye travels through the image. The whole scene has a painterly look to begin with.

So, my crop suggestions are for your original version only. As I said, one can crop seven ways to Sunday, but here are three of your original post. Not radical at all. Each has slight nuance in favour of something, depending on where your imaginary horizon lies in relation to the top and bottom of the images. The first is your original for comparison.

JMR
« Last Edit: August 15, 2010, 10:07:17 PM by John R »
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2010, 09:13:28 PM »

I find it quite appealing. My favorite version is John's second cropping.
This kind of subject was good enough for Monet. Perhaps some of the French Impressionist aesthetic rubbed off on you while you were in France.
Nice image!

Eric
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website. New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

shutterpup

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2010, 12:49:25 PM »

Of course I'll permit: that's partly why the image is here in the first place.

In fact, I took two sets of bracketed exposures of this scene. The other was taken in portrait: it has, therefore, more vertical and less horizontal capture. I looked at it but decided I liked the trees which bracketed the scene. One of the things which fascinates me about this forum is getting other people's opinions, so I returned to the portrait shot and fiddled with it a bit (removing that rather ugly pipe at the left of the underside of the bridge, for example, and cropping a bit off the top), giving the version attached to this post.

Comments?

I very much like the portrait version. Well balanced.

Jeremy

By way of historical background, Clos LucÚ, in Amboise, was the house in which Leonardo da Vinci died. It's been very well restored by an American owner and has models and animated reconstructions of several of Leonardo's best-known designs (the helicopter, for example). I suspect the old man would have been fascinated by what we can now do!
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kikashi

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Re: clos luce
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2010, 01:06:52 PM »

Well, your last vertical image is very good. It is no longer hemmed in or heavy on one side. The alternate white and dark trees on the right side balance nicely and are more like a visual resting point as the eye travels through the image. The whole scene has a painterly look to begin with.

So, my crop suggestions are for your original version only. As I said, one can crop seven ways to Sunday, but here are three of your original post. Not radical at all. Each has slight nuance in favour of something, depending on where your imaginary horizon lies in relation to the top and bottom of the images. The first is your original for comparison.

JMR

Thanks: it's fascinating to see how others might approach a shot. Looking at them all, I think my favourite is now my second attempt, the portrait shot. I'll make a print, put it on the wall and see if I get bored with it.

Jeremy
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