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Author Topic: La Montagne Sainte Victoire  (Read 1228 times)

alangubbay

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La Montagne Sainte Victoire
« on: May 06, 2010, 06:14:42 AM »

In memory of Paul Cezanne
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popnfresh

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La Montagne Sainte Victoire
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2010, 12:31:12 PM »

99% of the time I find heavily post-processed photos to be unspeakably awful. As someone mentioned here recently, they often look like cheap drugstore greeting cards. But I like this one. The kind of watercolor/solarized/edge-enhanced effect (or whatever it was) you used has made for a visually pleasing image, IMO. Good work.

I might lose the glider in the upper left, however. To me, it doesn't look like it belongs in the scene.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 12:38:58 PM by popnfresh »
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alangubbay

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La Montagne Sainte Victoire
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2010, 03:19:22 PM »

Thank you for the criticism.  You must be right about the glider because your view has been widely echoed. It will have to go.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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La Montagne Sainte Victoire
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2010, 03:24:08 PM »

Quote from: popnfresh
99% of the time I find heavily post-processed photos to be unspeakably awful. As someone mentioned here recently, they often look like cheap drugstore greeting cards. But I like this one. The kind of watercolor/solarized/edge-enhanced effect (or whatever it was) you used has made for a visually pleasing image, IMO. Good work.

I might lose the glider in the upper left, however. To me, it doesn't look like it belongs in the scene.
+1 ... especially on the glider.  

In addition, you managed to capture several elements of Cezanne's signature style right:  flat patterns, horizontals running parallel to the picture plane (as opposed to "leads in" diagonal lines of the classical landscape). To me, it looks like Cezanne was the first landscape artist to use telephoto lenses to flatten apparent perspective (hypothetically speaking of course).
« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 09:26:46 PM by Slobodan Blagojevic »
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