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Author Topic: How?  (Read 4166 times)

mikealex

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How?
« on: April 30, 2005, 08:51:35 AM »

You start by walking out your front door. There's always something there, it's just a matter of finding it.

I made this image on Wednesday night, standing in my driveway. The tree is on my front lawn. It was a very foggy night, which created the streaks of light.



First, you have to think about what it is that you are hoping to get. Not specifics, just general.

Do you want images of birds, then go somewhere where there will be lots of birds. Nature trails are good, since the birds tend to be used to people, and you can get a little closer.

It's a tough question to answer, mostly the answers are so simple when you think about it. Pick your subject, and then go to where your subject is.
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didger

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How?
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2005, 09:42:16 PM »

There's lots of websites with info about great shooting locations, there's books, there's collections of CD ROMS with searchable databases, there's sites that update things like where flowers are happening, etc.  A little time spent googling will be well rewarded.  However, even without all that, just go somewhere where there's pleasing things to look at and get your camera out and aim at whatever turns you on and frame it however the composition turns you on or if ya just gotta, learn some rules of composition to guide you.  Any nice State Parks or National Parks or recreation areas in Delaware?  There's nice stuff just about anywhere/everywhere.  Just do it and enjoy.
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framah

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How?
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2005, 06:42:59 PM »

Ladyk... You're in Delaware so you need to head down to Laurel. Around  there is Trussum Pond and Trap Pond State Park. It is the northern most stand of naturally occurring Cypress left in the US. You take your canoe down there and drop it in and wander thru the cypress swamp. There are actually canoe trails thru the swamp.  It's a GREAT place to shoot. The water moves slowly in there so you don't have to worry about movement while shooting. I used to go down there from NJ in the fall as the cypress leaves turn rust red and drop leaving a carpet of color on the water.  

   I usually look at maps and find state parks and points of interest listed. That's where I found this place.
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mikebinok

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How?
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2005, 10:01:23 PM »

Try Bombay Hook NWR.

Or closer to home, just go to your backyard (or a local park) with a macro lens on your camera and look at things closely.
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How?
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2005, 05:08:13 PM »

Thanks Ken! I'm definitely going to google search!

I prefer outdoor photography over the city as well!
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How?
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2005, 09:59:39 PM »

Can anyone tell me their specific techniques on finding a good locatio for shooting?
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How?
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2005, 09:20:58 PM »

I just wanted to see if people had certain techniques to finding a location!

Thank you sooo much for that!

The picture is absolutely beautiful!

I live in Delaware,so I don't think I'll have a problem with finding a pretty nice location!
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How?
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2005, 04:12:54 PM »

Quote
 Any nice State Parks or National Parks or recreation areas in Delaware?
I'm sure there is,but the east coast is made up of alot of forest,so finding good scenery wouldn't be much of a problem!

Thanks for your advice!
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How?
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2005, 03:32:57 PM »

Thanks for the useful info Framah!

I'll make sure I do that!
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How?
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2005, 03:00:43 PM »

Quote
Try Bombay Hook NWR.

Or closer to home, just go to your backyard (or a local park) with a macro lens on your camera and look at things closely.
That's basically what I was thinking of doing! I live around alot of tree areas ,where squirrels and other things roam!

I'm getting really excited about this!
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kensmith99

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How?
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2005, 09:25:41 PM »

I like to check out Google and do a search on something; e.g.,
http://www.google.com/search?....=Search

   I always add in the word Photograph, and hopefully some of the returns have pictures of the place.  Often, the composition of the pictures gives me ideas, even if I'm photographing something totally different.  Or, I might see a neat picture like Mike posted on this thread, then try to duplicate concept on my own.

   I personally like outdoor photography over city photography.  I recently went to Oregon and Nrn CA and did Google searches on many places, plus folks in this forum gave me ideas.  They led me to Redwoods National Park, several state parks in southern Oregon (on the coast), and lots of nice waterfalls in Oregon.

Ken
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bobby sargent

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How?
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2005, 02:04:31 PM »

Well the best way I have found to find a great location is to just get out of the car and start walking.

I have been walking over locations for the last 30 years.

I just got back from a trip shoot with 3 models to Grants NM. I took them to some way out of the way location.  During the shoot one of the girls asked "How in the h   ll did you find this place"  That was simple.  I just gor out of the car and started walking and found it.

There are so many places to see and shoot that nobody gives them a second glance.  Their mistake.

Hope this helps.  bs :laugh:
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