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Author Topic: Test your color skills  (Read 21872 times)

Justan

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Test your color skills
« on: December 15, 2009, 09:52:38 AM »

FACT: 1 out of 255 women and 1 out of 12 men have some form of color vision deficiency.
Take the online color challenge, based on the official FM100 Hue Test by X-Rite.

Best possible score is 0 and the worst or highest is 1241


I got 16

http://www.xrite.com/custom_page.aspx?PageID=77

Colorwave

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« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2009, 12:35:01 PM »

A little disappointed with a score of 7.
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neil snape

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« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2009, 12:54:45 PM »

I did this test a few days ago and got 8. No idea if that is good, average, poor.

What I did find interesting is the graph of the colour ranges where my eyes had there fall off points, which where very correctly placed.

I did the test on my second HP Dreamworks monitor, calibrated and profiled with the HP APS for this monitor.
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Wayne Fox

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« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2009, 01:56:53 PM »

4 for me.  Seems I have a little problem in the salmon colored region.
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Ken Bennett

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« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2009, 04:02:12 PM »

14. Getting old sucks.
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Hening Bettermann

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« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2009, 05:37:15 PM »

Male 67, score 8, weak in red and green.

JeffKohn

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« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2009, 06:28:50 PM »

*  Your score: 0
    * Gender: Male
    * Age range: 30-39
    * Best score for your gender and age range: 0
    * Highest score for your gender and age range: 1324

Simon J.A. Simpson

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Test your color skills
« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2009, 06:29:34 PM »

This is a pretty silly test since one's perception of colour and colour differences vary, depending on the colours they are placed next to.  This is a well know fact of colour perception, a fact exploited by Van Gogh when he was painting his sunflower pictures.  He was finally able to get the intense yellow he sought by making the background colour a pale greeny-blue (other paintings have yellow backgrounds).  This is known from correspondence of Van Gogh with others, notably his brother Theo.  Most good books on photography refer to this effect.

See also this and related links:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_constancy

I am sure that everyone found as I did, that once the similar colours are placed adjacent to each other that it became much more difficult to tell the difference between them - a demonstration of the effect that adjacent colours have on each other.

Folks.  The test is hokum.  Your scores highly unreliable.  The good news is that your eyesight and visual perception are just fine.  Rest easy and enjoy a happy, and colourful, Christmas !
« Last Edit: December 15, 2009, 06:30:01 PM by SimonS »
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JeffKohn

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Test your color skills
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2009, 06:38:27 PM »

Quote
I am sure that everyone found as I did, that once the similar colours are placed adjacent to each other that it became much more difficult to tell the difference between them - a demonstration of the effect that adjacent colours have on each other.
It's true that when the tiles are in the correct sequence some of them look almost identical. But when you move one out of order by just one spot, the error in the sequence should be pretty apparent, because our visual system picks up on these types of subtle irregularities.

If there's a flaw in the test, I think it would be that a poor-quality display could make things much more difficult (as would a less-than stellar LUT-based display profile, I suspect).

Czornyj

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« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2009, 06:43:17 PM »

Zero.
I wonder if I trained my perception while painting, designing and staring at the test color patches and images while profiling printers and displays, or it's just a natural skill...
« Last Edit: December 15, 2009, 06:44:32 PM by Czornyj »
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Colorwave

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« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2009, 06:52:45 PM »

I thought that this was a dual purpose test to evaluate both monitor and color profile, as well as color perception and acuity.  Obviously, without a decent display, no eyes are going to be able to discriminate between similar shades, but that is part of the integrated system we use every day and are testing here.  Of course, color perception is based on many factors, but I don't see how distinguishing subtle differences in colors could not be a worthwhile skill to evaluate.
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feppe

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« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2009, 07:35:52 PM »

4, Samsung 215TW calibrated with a Spyder 2, 34-year-old male eyes calibrated with Argentinian red wine. Had my four wrong all next to each other midway between green and yellow, which was the toughest row for me.

Not sure about monitor tech, but none of these colors were fully saturated, so that should minimize the impact a poorly calibrated or clipping monitor would have?

Pretty meaningless test since it doesn't give any score distribution for your age/sex group, or even average or median, just min and max.

Quote from: SimonS
This is a pretty silly test since one's perception of colour and colour differences vary...

I take it you got a score of well over 15?
« Last Edit: December 15, 2009, 07:43:20 PM by feppe »
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2009, 09:14:30 PM »

I've got you guys beat all hollow. Male, age 70, with "red-green" color-blindness: 108.   

If I spent a lot of time at it, I think I might be able to get it down to about 100. You see why I feel more comfortable in black-and-white.

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Ray

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Test your color skills
« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2009, 09:31:54 PM »

You are all wasting your time unless your monitor is calibrated to the same standard as the test charts.
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fike

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« Reply #14 on: December 15, 2009, 09:34:53 PM »

without any real effort or time investment, I got a 14.
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Wayne Fox

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« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2009, 09:39:50 PM »

Quote from: Ray
You are all wasting your time unless your monitor is calibrated to the same standard as the test charts.

I found it an interesting exercise.

I did the test twice, scored 4 both times, and having the same problem region.  Once with my own monitor profile built with i1 match,  the other with the apple stock profile.  While the colors look different, they differences don't affect them in a way to be deceiving.  All the colors shift in a way they still seem to progress from one side to the other.  This isn't about color accuracy, just the perception of subtle color differences.

Since I found the same color regions gave me problems both times, even though the second time I knew about the problem and tried really hard to get it right but didn't, I would assume there is possibly something in the way my eyes and brain are interpreting that color that makes me "different". I won't use the word deficient, since as humans we all see things slightly differently anyway.

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Ray

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« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2009, 11:32:48 PM »

Quote from: Wayne Fox
This isn't about color accuracy, just the perception of subtle color differences.

It definitely is about both color accuracy and your perception of color differences. The starting position should be complete uniformity of the calibration standards employed in the creation of the colored hues, and the calibration of your monitor.

If there are any differences in those two calibration standards, it's not possible to determine which differences are due to calibration effects and which differences are due to your visual deficiencies.
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Wayne Fox

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Test your color skills
« Reply #17 on: December 16, 2009, 02:24:15 AM »

Quote from: Ray
It definitely is about both color accuracy and your perception of color differences. The starting position should be complete uniformity of the calibration standards employed in the creation of the colored hues, and the calibration of your monitor.

If there are any differences in those two calibration standards, it's not possible to determine which differences are due to calibration effects and which differences are due to your visual deficiencies.
 
whatever.  Just did the test on an uncalibrated iMac.  score 4, again.  Problem is in the same area, again despite my knowing.  Calibration doesn't seem to cause a deceptive condition.
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Neuffy

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Test your color skills
« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2009, 02:37:42 AM »

Male in mid-20s with partial Red-Green Colorblindness. Score: 16.

I think I may have become ... better with color? since starting to work so much with photo editing and printing. I have previously failed colorblindness tests, now I pass most of them.

Etienne Cassar

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« Reply #19 on: December 16, 2009, 04:10:08 AM »

I am a 34yr old male and just carried out this test at work on an low end uncalibrated display.  Got 3.  Will try it again when I get home on my NEC 2690 Spectraview Reference monitor and see what I get.
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