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Morgan_Moore

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« on: December 07, 2009, 04:49:02 AM »

http://www.sammorganmoore.com/smmcom/blogger2.asp?blogid=77

Thought people may be interested in this

not that either the image or the video are great

in two hours on scene I was able to shoot a still image for a hoarding and also a short web video

tools

Nikon D3 for the still
Canon DSLR
SonyEX1 VidCam
Miller Tripod etc

The cool thing to me is I am developing a business offer that is a littler different from joe the photographer and some clients are starting to bite !

S



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Morgan_Moore

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« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2010, 05:37:28 AM »

another example of 'new photography' a moving product pic..


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Morgan_Moore

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« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2010, 03:26:13 PM »

Quote from: John-S
Only intended as a constructive comment, but the motion is just not smooth enough, has a handheld with IS lens look.

There is a reason that for very smooth and clean motion control a lot of motored jib/cranes are used which also help in reproducing/tracking the same movement if needed.

Indeed - this was MK1 of home made jib, there was flex (bounce) in the 1960s gitzo head that I was using, Ive found a frotto head that is giving better results - my main video head a miller is used on the front of the jib and I cant affrd a second fluid head right now at $1500

shooting with  a 50mm macro is a big test of a jib and focus pulling

I still think manual operation can be more organic than a machine, especially if you are following a moving human (which I was not in this case)

Forgetting the technicalities my main point is that my client.. Candle Company (no i didnt shoot the indivudual product images) has a rolling slideshow on their homepage

I see it being swapped for a looping flash video of this nature - i am trying to gain the skills so that I can offer them this service - and others

S

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fredjeang

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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2010, 05:01:51 PM »

Quote from: Morgan_Moore
Indeed - this was MK1 of home made jib, there was flex (bounce) in the 1960s gitzo head that I was using, Ive found a frotto head that is giving better results - my main video head a miller is used on the front of the jib and I cant affrd a second fluid head right now at $1500

shooting with  a 50mm macro is a big test of a jib and focus pulling

I still think manual operation can be more organic than a machine, especially if you are following a moving human (which I was not in this case)

Forgetting the technicalities my main point is that my client.. Candle Company (no i didnt shoot the indivudual product images) has a rolling slideshow on their homepage

I see it being swapped for a looping flash video of this nature - i am trying to gain the skills so that I can offer them this service - and others

S
Hi,
One tool that appears quickly in this trailer, (second 35, the wheel), might be a very interesting option, so you keep manual freedom. I've seen it in action and it just work ! I do not know where to find it.

Fred.
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bill t.

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« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2010, 01:48:47 AM »

The candle video shows the classic battle between pan and dolly when looking sideways.  Panning either takes away from, or adds to the dolly movement.  Just a little bit of pan adds a large left-right movement along the dolly axis.  The result is a kind of herky-jerky motion that never looks natural.  And being close-in makes it worse.  The classic visual efx solution is to place the camera lens on the head so the rotation point of the pan axis is somewhere inside the lens, or to use a motion control system that knows now to solve the geometry of a swinging pan axis so that track and pan would work together as a single linear axis.

But even as is you would get a much more natural effect if you had something as simple as a dolly axis motor, or even just a good dolly grip who could push at a consistent rate.  Then the pan & tilt operator could concentrate on a nice smooth pan, which is challenge enough for one person.  The trick on the pan would be to keep it constantly moving with very slow accelerations and decelerations.  The pan would still add in to the dolly move, but only as slight variations in speed rather than sudden lurches.  One trick I've seen table top shooters use is to tie a long bungee cord to the dolly, say maybe a 20 feet cord for a 2 or 3 foot move, with slight tension on the cord at the loosest position.  Adds the same sort of damping to the track as a fluid head does to the pan/tilt.  Of course, don't forget and release the dolly, which can be very exciting.
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Morgan_Moore

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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2010, 07:21:05 AM »

The lurching in the shots is caused by the flexibilty of the self made MK1 boom arm

Ive built a better one now

To me the question is

In a web environment can short 'films' of this nature provide a more 'powerful/emntertaining/eyegrabbing' introduction to the clients product than a still photo or slide show of stills ?

S
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Peter McLennan

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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2010, 11:47:07 AM »

Quote from: Morgan_Moore
To me the question is
In a web environment can short 'films' of this nature provide a more 'powerful/emntertaining/eyegrabbing' introduction to the clients product than a still photo or slide show of stills ?
S

Absolutely.

That a solo photographer equipped with a few thousand dollars worth of gear can replicate motion image quality only previously obtainable with a 35mm film crew is disruptive technology.  We ignore it at our peril.
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