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Author Topic: Standard Sizes  (Read 1696 times)
michelson
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« on: October 11, 2009, 07:11:58 PM »
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I have a printer that can do 13x19 borderless as it's maximum, and am working out the final hurdles in production before really offering any prints. Note in advance that I anticipate selling prints to the budget conscious, and am not looking to outsource my printing to obtain larger formats.

Over the last few days I've been leaning more towards borders instead of borderless printing. The advantages of long term durability, and the ease of mounting lead me to believe this is the way to go. Am I correct in gathering that borders are the norm for prints?


In regards to the size, the maximum standard size I can fit is 11x14, which has a lot to be desired as far as it's aspect ratio is concerned. My camera produces a w/h ratio of 1.46, close to 13x19's 1.49. In contrast, 11x14's ratio is 1.27 which crops a significant chunk off the long edge of an image.

The question here is this: Are non standard size prints such a bad practice? Considering the budget conscious buyer, who most likely will go with a pre-manufactured frame and matte, should I stick them with the extra burden? Or, should I crop the image the way it should be, and print it fit it within an 11x14 area (so say, the actual image would be 9.5x14), even though the image's actual aspect ratio doesn't fit the available frames and matting? Or is it the norm to give in to the standard sizes?

I am unaware of what the norm is, in regards to this.

Thanks!
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JeffKohn
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2009, 01:38:44 PM »
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I'm not sure there really is a 'norm'. Some people crop to standard print sizes, but depending on how you compose and shoot this could hurt the quality of your images. For 13x19" paper, a 12x18" print size works well, leaving you a little bit of border around the print. These can be matted and placed in 18x24" frames which are standard (although not as common as some other sizes).
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josphine
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« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2015, 05:15:55 AM »
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Hello   Roll Eyes

Well, I feel that rather than opting some other options why don't you opt for 13X19 frame only. It will not only save your time but also your money. You can have a look at ARTTOFRAME and view huge collection of various frame types and materials that are available.  In fact when I was wondering that from where will I get 13X19 frame someone suggested me with this site. I loved its quality after ordering one, I ordered for 2 more for my sister.

Hope this site works for you too!

Have a look at my picture frames!

Cheers  Shocked
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Mike D. B.
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« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2015, 06:54:35 AM »
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Standard size frames or norm sizes will vary depending upon country and availablity - so I don't want to mention any specifics.  But I'll tell you what I do: I purchase the frame and matt (or without matt) and then print accordingly.  I always print with a (bare paper) margin.  This allows the person handling the print to touch it without leaving fingerprints on the image itself.  Usually I sign the print on the back along with the date.

When framing, I try to use adhesive corners, into which I slide the photo - I don't tape of paste an image onto a backboard or matt.  I also search for acid-free matting and frame material which won't damage the print (too much).  I employ the same style when framing smaller images, as when framing a larger print.  Mike's & Jeff's tutorial showed framing quite well - I think it was named "From Capture to Print" or something similar.  Everyone who received a framed print from me has been satisfied up to now.
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luxborealis
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« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2015, 08:35:17 AM »
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You could, in fact, offer a third size: a standard 16x20 frame with a print matted to approx. 12x16.

With regards to "whar's normal", there are differing views as to how tied people are to, as you correctly say, budget and, in addition, how tied people are to their pre-conceptions.

If you are producing for the budget conscious, the stick to normal frame and mat sizes. That may mean compromising your cropping/composition, but that's the price you pay for standardization. Remember, though, you have two standards you can work within... The old 11x14 & 16x20 and the new as Jeff mentioned, 12x18 and 8x12. (Then, there's the IKEA standard which is different again, but with the frames so cheap, you could offer the whole package at a reasonable price.)

If you want to take the extra step of cutting your own mats, then you can be a little more forgiving with the aspect ratio within one of the standard mat sizes. Sell the print in the mat with backing (actually a standard practice not only to protect the photograph, but to present it as you want it presented). Your customer can then buy there own frame and all is well.

The unfortunate part in all of this is that you become more of a mat (and possibly frame) buyer and cutter and assembler, etc. with less time actually doing photography. It's a trade-off for sure. Good luck with it!
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Terry McDonald
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