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Author Topic: whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier  (Read 2846 times)

PierreVandevenne

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whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier
« on: September 07, 2009, 05:31:05 PM »

By Serge Brunier, one of the most respected French amateur and
author.

http://sergebrunier.com/gallerie/pleinciel/index-eng.html

Make sure you also look at the time lapse video at the bottom of the page.
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Mark D Segal

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whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2009, 06:02:56 PM »

Unbelievable - thanks so much for bringing this to our attention.

Mark
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml

bill t.

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whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2009, 06:40:24 PM »

Beautiful work, digital has finally allowed to us record images of the night sky the way our mind perceives them.

Fabulous timelapse.  Truly conveys the rotation of the Earth.  I have often gone out to see the stars but have yet to find a place with such an impressively dark and clear horizon.
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Colorwave

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whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2009, 07:57:13 PM »

As someone who lives 45 minutes from the top of Mauna Kea, I can vouch for the difference in light polluted skies vs. not.  It is as if someone forgot to plug in most of the lights until you find really clear skies to view the cosmos from.  

Nothing makes you feel more insignificant than a sky full of vivid stars, galaxies, etc.  The milk way only seemed vaguely milky until I got an eyeful up there. The 10,000 galaxies they found in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field Image project, a patch of sky the size of a quarter held at arms length (that seems empty) is a testament to what's up there.  I think human awe is perfectly fine tuned for contemplating a beautiful night sky.

Thanks for sharing these gorgeous photos.
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BernardLanguillier

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whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2009, 10:38:10 PM »

Very nice indeed!

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!

Eric Myrvaagnes

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whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2009, 11:44:50 PM »

Wow!!!
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website. New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

Lisa Nikodym

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whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2009, 01:42:08 PM »

Seriously cool!  Thanks very much for posting this.

Lisa

NicholasDown

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whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2009, 12:50:35 AM »

This is utterly awe inspiring!
This pioneering project needs to be celebrated worldwide and Serge should be nominated for the IPA award 2010 (IMHO)
I remember seeing the southern stars as a child in East Africa in the 1960s and ever since then have longed to see them as they really are, without light pollution...
Thank you for your dedication, perseverance and sheer brilliance.
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CustomerService

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whole sky panorama by Serge Brunier
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2009, 03:05:36 PM »

NASA's Hubble photos published today are also awe-inspiring
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