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Author Topic: Reproducing what you saw  (Read 5857 times)

RSL

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2009, 05:44:01 PM »

Christian and Chuck,

Fair enough. As usual, I'd suggest bringing both pictures up on your monitor at the same time and putting one above the other for comparison. I don't agree that the crop improves the picture, but if it floats your boat that's all that matters. I think the up-sloping vegetation at the left is a terminating detail that significantly improves the composition, and the start of the mountains gives depth to the picture that's lost when it's cropped out. I also think the vegetation in the center keeps your eye from falling off the edge of the plateau. I think Ray saw an excellent composition all at once and succeeded very well at reproducing what he saw.

cmi

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #21 on: July 29, 2009, 06:49:04 PM »

Quote from: ckimmerle
The original photo is overall very nice, but I am bothered by the part of the foreground that just barely slips beneath the image frame. It's my own aesthetic, but major shapes that just "miss" the image area trouble me. My brain wants to see what's hidden. I think that's where the second crop (Christian?) makes an improvement. By moving the bottom crop higher in the frame, much of the foreground is well beneath the image area so eliminates that issue (at least as I see it)

Chuck

Funny you say that, I tried that... however I have the feeling, this image cannot be changed substantially.
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ckimmerle

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #22 on: July 29, 2009, 09:00:28 PM »

Quote from: RSL
...I think the up-sloping vegetation at the left is a terminating detail that significantly improves the composition, and the start of the mountains gives depth to the picture that's lost when it's cropped out. I also think the vegetation in the center keeps your eye from falling off the edge of the plateau...

Still leaning towards Christian's crop, but in retrospect I have a firmer grasp of why. The original crop left off a bit of the foreground near the middle, making the bottom of the frame resemble a funnel. I think that funnel effect is drawing my eyes off of the frame at the point where the foreground drops below the print edge.. Perhaps that is where I feeling a bit of visual discomfort.

Had there been a bit more of that middle foreground (or cropped up as Christian had done) then I think it would be a stronger composition. Christian is correct, though. There is not much that can really be done aside from what he has already shown.

That said, again, I like the image and think it's pretty effective. I just think it could have been even more effective with a better attended foreground.

Chuck
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"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes." Marcel Proust

Chuck Kimmerle
WWW.CHUCKKIMMERLE.COM

Ray

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #23 on: July 30, 2009, 02:11:15 AM »

Actually, when I first saw Christian's rendition, I failed to notice that he had cloned out a section of foliage in the middle, bottom edge. This is probably because he stated that he had cloned out a mountain part, and my attention was directed to which part, but I couldn't find it. Maybe too many glasses of wine.

As regards the cropping on the left, I tend to agree with Russ that the rising line of foliage on the left helps to frame the picture, and the temporary ending of the mountain range, clearly visible in the uncropped version, tends to add a sense of completion.

Cropping the image tends to create the impression one has captured only part of the scene and one gets a slight sense of incompletion.

I'm not sure about the foliage bottom centre.
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popnfresh

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2009, 04:57:06 PM »

The first composition is the best. However, the shot would work better for me if there was something interesting in the foreground. The background is great, but I don't feel it's quite enough to carry the composition without a compelling foreground.
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RSL

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #25 on: July 30, 2009, 05:16:23 PM »

Quote from: popnfresh
The first composition is the best. However, the shot would work better for me if there was something interesting in the foreground. The background is great, but I don't feel it's quite enough to carry the composition without a compelling foreground.

I agree. You should always carry a scantily-clad model with you to provide a compelling foreground in situations like this.

Ray

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #26 on: July 31, 2009, 10:28:56 AM »

Quote from: RSL
I agree. You should always carry a scantily-clad model with you to provide a compelling foreground in situations like this.

I have to admit, I'm not entirely happy with the foreground, but that's how it was, approximately. The sloping terrain also wasn't a good base for my tripod. But I'm always willing to please the customer. The foreground is boring? I'll take up Russ's suggestion. Is this better?  Is this sufficient motivation to get up at 4am to go trekking?  

[attachment=15807:Modified...reground.jpg]
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popnfresh

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #27 on: July 31, 2009, 11:37:27 AM »

Quote from: Ray
I have to admit, I'm not entirely happy with the foreground, but that's how it was, approximately. The sloping terrain also wasn't a good base for my tripod. But I'm always willing to please the customer. The foreground is boring? I'll take up Russ's suggestion. Is this better?  Is this sufficient motivation to get up at 4am to go trekking?  

[attachment=15807:Modified...reground.jpg]
I have to say that that's the best damn landscape ever posted! Bravo!
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RSL

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #28 on: July 31, 2009, 12:34:03 PM »

Definitely a compelling foreground! Probably the most compelling I've seen in landscape photography. The only remaining question is: what does it compel?

Ray

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Reproducing what you saw
« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2009, 12:45:32 PM »

Quote from: RSL
Definitely a compelling foreground! Probably the most compelling I've seen in landscape photography. The only remaining question is: what does it compel?


To get up early to see the sunrise, perhaps.  
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