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Author Topic: Bokeh  (Read 10353 times)

cmi

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Bokeh
« Reply #20 on: July 09, 2009, 02:52:50 PM »

Quote from: RSL
Christian, Hear, hear! That's the most sensible statement I've seen about bokeh.

Overlooked your answer - Well I came to this out of my practical experience, the bokeh in my images always looked decent, it was just never so important for me, or so bad like in the images here.

And I must say Olaf has a strong point here. Although I was aware that my lenses produced very different bokeh for all sort of settings, scenery and light, I never really thought about it so much to actually draw the conclusion he wrote. (And probably could not have said it so good...) For example, I was always pleased that for its price, the 18-55 Kit from Canon has a very good bokeh in Macro situations. But NOW I would not be surprised if someone pointed out that pretty much ALL macro images have good bokeh in most situations. So for Kikashis case that would mean, the lens is not worse or better then any other sample, instead the particular shooting situation was just bad. I think thats the point Olaf was trying to make.


Christian

//edit: Overlooked, not oversaw
« Last Edit: July 09, 2009, 04:05:55 PM by Christian Miersch »
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dalethorn

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Bokeh
« Reply #21 on: July 09, 2009, 05:06:01 PM »

Quote from: Christian Miersch
Overlooked your answer - Well I came to this out of my practical experience, the bokeh in my images always looked decent, it was just never so important for me, or so bad like in the images here.
And I must say Olaf has a strong point here. Although I was aware that my lenses produced very different bokeh for all sort of settings, scenery and light, I never really thought about it so much to actually draw the conclusion he wrote. (And probably could not have said it so good...) For example, I was always pleased that for its price, the 18-55 Kit from Canon has a very good bokeh in Macro situations. But NOW I would not be surprised if someone pointed out that pretty much ALL macro images have good bokeh in most situations. So for Kikashis case that would mean, the lens is not worse or better then any other sample, instead the particular shooting situation was just bad. I think thats the point Olaf was trying to make.
Christian
//edit: Overlooked, not oversaw

This makes me curious. We can get all kinds of books on photographic principles, editing programs and techniques, even developing techniques for film work. But other than specific (and sometimes expensive) books written for a specific camera like you see in Barnes & Noble etc., are there texts that cover this sort of thing in detail, with a comprehensive list of camera bodies and lenses?  I'm guessing it would be a great seller, since every camera and lens combination seems to incorporate a lot of black magic (or it just accidentally works in most cases).
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cmi

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Bokeh
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2009, 05:43:09 PM »

Quote from: dalethorn
This makes me curious. We can get all kinds of books on photographic principles, editing programs and techniques, even developing techniques for film work. But other than specific (and sometimes expensive) books written for a specific camera like you see in Barnes & Noble etc., are there texts that cover this sort of thing in detail, with a comprehensive list of camera bodies and lenses?  I'm guessing it would be a great seller, since every camera and lens combination seems to incorporate a lot of black magic (or it just accidentally works in most cases).

Im afraid if the bokeh in a certain situation is horrible, you have very limited possibility to change that, so such a book would become superfluous. Furthermore, people working in film or in a studio situation know these situations from experience anyway. You learn that, you dont read about it. From a physics or engineering standpoint however it might be interesting, but its not neccessary for shooting. Maybe lens engineers or camera mens who use a lot of different lenses could probably sum this up.

If you where really curious about this you could grab 2-4 different lenses of the same lenght, a tripod, and with some lens changing make comparisations in the field in order to get a feeling for it.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2009, 05:52:47 PM by Christian Miersch »
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DarkPenguin

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Bokeh
« Reply #23 on: July 09, 2009, 06:11:21 PM »

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RSL

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Bokeh
« Reply #24 on: July 09, 2009, 06:37:21 PM »

Thanks, Dark. I'd say that that article is dispositive. The bottom line seems to be that good bokeh is in the eye of the beholder.
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