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Author Topic: Sandstone Erosion  (Read 2507 times)

jasonrandolph

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Sandstone Erosion
« on: April 21, 2009, 11:53:44 AM »

I tried to create a composition using the S-curves cut into the sandstone.  How did I do?  Thanks for your feedback!

dalethorn

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2009, 12:07:20 PM »

Looks really good.  Pardon my edit here - I cropped a teeny bit off the bottom and squeezed it a bit.

Either way, it's definitely frameable.
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jasonrandolph

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2009, 12:20:42 PM »

Quote from: dalethorn
Looks really good.  Pardon my edit here - I cropped a teeny bit off the bottom and squeezed it a bit.

Either way, it's definitely frameable.
Thanks Dale.  Good input.  Much appreciated.

kikashi

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2009, 12:44:24 PM »

Quote from: jasonrandolph
I tried to create a composition using the S-curves cut into the sandstone.  How did I do?  Thanks for your feedback!
It's good. I always like the colour of sandstone, though: does it really benefit from being in b&w?

Jeremy
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popnfresh

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2009, 12:48:59 PM »

Quote from: dalethorn
Looks really good.  Pardon my edit here - I cropped a teeny bit off the bottom and squeezed it a bit.

Either way, it's definitely frameable.
The crop works for me.
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dalethorn

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2009, 04:17:56 PM »

Quote from: kikashi
It's good. I always like the colour of sandstone, though: does it really benefit from being in b&w?
Jeremy

Pink Floyd's Ummagumma LP from 1969 contained artwork that had similar patterns, although they were probably in wood rather than stone. They were always in B&W, and considered very effective as art, based on my conversations with fans at that time. And this image is reminiscent of Floyd's, IMO.
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wolfnowl

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2009, 02:06:20 AM »

Great lines... I think either crop could work, and the B&W highlights the textures.

Mike.
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francois

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2009, 02:32:05 AM »

I like the S-lines but the texture is what I like most. Both crops are fine to me.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2009, 02:32:42 AM by francois »
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Francois

jasonrandolph

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2009, 03:00:38 AM »

Quote from: francois
I like the S-lines but the texture is what I like most. Both crops are fine to me.

Thank you all!

@Jeremy:  I considered leaving it in color, but from the same shoot I got "Sandstone & Sea", which is in color and posted below.  Also, my eyes are biased toward B&W, and there wasn't much color in the original RAW file.  Thanks for the feedback regardless.

John R

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2009, 08:49:43 AM »

I prefer the first crop and allowing the bottom eroded area to make its curve and have room under it. Love the sharpness and texture, which appears to come from the tonal gradations.

JMR
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jasonrandolph

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Sandstone Erosion
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2009, 11:25:06 AM »

Quote from: John R
I prefer the first crop and allowing the bottom eroded area to make its curve and have room under it. Love the sharpness and texture, which appears to come from the tonal gradations.

JMR
Thanks John.  I wasn't sure how this one would be received, but I'm encouraged by the responses.  I appreciate all the feedback.
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