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Author Topic: My first (real) model shoot  (Read 1670 times)

lattiboy

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My first (real) model shoot
« on: February 01, 2009, 01:13:15 PM »

There was a workshop here in Seattle for shooting models hosted by Miss Aniela from flickr. I was bored and it was free. Not really my kind of thing, but it was interesting to attend. Didn't want to haul around the Tammy 70-200mm, so I grabbed my 22 year old beercan (Minolta 70-210mm f/4) and threw caution to the wind. What a lens! WB is very wrong in a few, but it was a "group shoot" so I can't complain too much. Click through for larger sizes.

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4)



5)



6)

« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 01:20:30 PM by lattiboy »
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Roger Calixto

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My first (real) model shoot
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2009, 03:55:18 PM »

I like the dynamics and the feel of #2. The others didn't really catch my eye.

Cheers!
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If my day job wasn't so cool, I'd quit and be a photographer =)

larkvi

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My first (real) model shoot
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2009, 06:38:05 AM »

The model looks uncomfortable and like she has nothing to do but pose in all the photos. I think giving her something natural and comfortable to do could create a good deal of improvement. In #2, the position is kind of striking until I look more at in and see that she is not actually doing anything, and looks uncomfortable in the pose.

Facial expression is really disinterested--you need to engage the model somehow.

The color scheme of the photo could use some work, either to introduce complement or contrast or to pull together the disparate elements--I really don't see the red pillow, blue/white pillow, black dress, and brown pillows as really bespeaking a lot of thought about the color nature of the photos (if it weren't so obviously posed, this would be less of an issue). The red chair totally steals the show in the second photo, to me.

I think you could really stand to use light intensity or color to separate the model from the background better, and also make more subtle tonal changes from shadow to highlight on the model. Catch-lights likely wouldn't hurt, either.

Just a few thoughts.
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Bill Koenig

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My first (real) model shoot
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2009, 01:54:44 PM »

I have a problem with the lighting. Who set up the lights? The light is very hard and unbalanced. If there was only one light source, a white card would help fill in the shadows.
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Bill Koenig,

Rob C

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My first (real) model shoot
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2009, 05:13:38 AM »

Simply underlines the pointlessness of these situations, the level of model who would take part.

Go off somewhere for the day with somebody suitable and just do it.

It isnīt going to come on a plate; if it does, itīs just meat.

Rob C
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