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Author Topic: Winter After the Fire  (Read 2238 times)

bretedge

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Winter After the Fire
« on: January 07, 2009, 02:15:53 PM »

I went up to the La Sal Mountains yesterday with the intention of photographing a fresh (late fall 2008) wildfire burn in the snow.  I forgot my snowshoes and only got about a mile in knee deep snow before I decided to break out the long lens and make some interesting, semi-abstract images of the area.  The textures and patterns were amazing.  I used my 100-400mm lens to extract some scenes that caught my attention.  I came home with several images I'm quite happy with, this being my favorite of the collection.

Thanks for having a look and leaving a comment.

5D2, 100-400mm lens, slight crop from bottom in PS

mtnmanjc

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Winter After the Fire
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2009, 04:31:19 PM »

Hey Bret,

Some very interesting textures and patterns!!!!  I like it!!!

Joel
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wolfnowl

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Winter After the Fire
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2009, 03:45:06 AM »

If you have the opportunity, go back to this site in about six months and you'll be amazed at the changes.  Fire is often considered a destructive force (and it can be), but it's also an integral part of renewing most of the world's forest ecosystems.

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
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bretedge

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Winter After the Fire
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2009, 11:05:36 AM »

Quote from: wolfnowl
If you have the opportunity, go back to this site in about six months and you'll be amazed at the changes.  Fire is often considered a destructive force (and it can be), but it's also an integral part of renewing most of the world's forest ecosystems.

Mike.

I plan to revisit this area every season as long as I'm in Moab.  It's a project of mine.  The fire happened at the tail end of fall color last year and there wasn't much of anything to photograph up there.  This spring should see some wildflowers and other new growth.  It's going to be an interesting project, for sure.

DanVH

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Winter After the Fire
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2009, 09:22:48 PM »

Love trees, even more in the winter!
I like the diagonal movement of the image-monotone to color and detail to void. It has just enough texture to look like a color pencil drawing.
Very nice!
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John R

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Winter After the Fire
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2009, 09:29:43 PM »

Quote from: bretedge
I went up to the La Sal Mountains yesterday with the intention of photographing a fresh (late fall 2008) wildfire burn in the snow.  I forgot my snowshoes and only got about a mile in knee deep snow before I decided to break out the long lens and make some interesting, semi-abstract images of the area.  The textures and patterns were amazing.  I used my 100-400mm lens to extract some scenes that caught my attention.  I came home with several images I'm quite happy with, this being my favorite of the collection.

Thanks for having a look and leaving a comment.

5D2, 100-400mm lens, slight crop from bottom in PS
Very nice, it has a certain edginess and freshness to it.

John R
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bretedge

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Winter After the Fire
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2009, 12:39:22 PM »

Thank you for your comments, Dan and John!

Petrjay

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Winter After the Fire
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2009, 02:50:29 PM »

Gorgeous image Bret. Very well done.

Peter J
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