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Author Topic: Polarizing Filters and digital cameras  (Read 3046 times)

jeffreybehr

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Polarizing Filters and digital cameras
« on: February 28, 2003, 12:08:42 PM »

R, I feel a polarizer is absolutely essential for landscape fotografy.  The results of a polarizer, increased saturation by reduced glare, cannot be duplicated in postprocessing.

I used to carry grad-NDs but Michaels's tutorial convinced me to try Fred Miranda's action.  Now I 'always' shoot 2 frames, one exposed for overall (ie hilites), and one 1 stop brighter.

I also carry 2 Cokin colored polarizers but use them very little.  I no longer carry grad-NDs.
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mtalaat

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Polarizing Filters and digital cameras
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2003, 06:42:37 PM »

I use Fred Miranda'a actions on a Mac. They should act the same since they are actions (using PS as the engine) and not plug-ins (using the processor as an engine).
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Dan Sroka

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Polarizing Filters and digital cameras
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2003, 05:04:59 PM »

If find that the color temperature controls (in Nikon Capture, or Adobe RAW plug-in) warm or cool a photo more "naturally".
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RNB

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Polarizing Filters and digital cameras
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2003, 09:11:28 AM »

I'm not sure that this hasn't been covered before, but I haven't found it.

I would figure that many filters which we might have used with film would be unnecessary with digital, at least those that adjusted color (warming and cooling).

But what about Polarizers? My guess is that these are still worth using, but would welcome comments.

Also, although Michael has explained how ND filters can be replaced by overlapping bracketed photos and adjusting in photoshop, would you carry a graduated ND filter if you only were packing a monopod or no pod.

Any other filters that are still usefull? My preference is to post process where possible.

Thands
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RNB

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Polarizing Filters and digital cameras
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2003, 12:38:44 PM »

Jeffry,

Thanks for the input. Tell me, do Fred Miranda actions work happily for Macs as well as PCs?
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jeffreybehr

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Polarizing Filters and digital cameras
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2003, 11:29:41 AM »

R, I should have said in my first note that I also don't use or carry color-balance filters.  Photoshop does those perfectly with NO optical flaws (eg reduction of resolution, contrast-reducing glare, scratches, etc.).  BTW, I use Color Balance (Control- for slight color rebalancing equivalent to the 81-series warming filters.  About 5 points each of red and yellow duplicates the 81A, about 10 points each for a 'B', and 15 points each for a 'C' work well for me.  Do the opposite if you need to 'cool' an image.  Of course, PS's Camera Raw fixes the color-balance errors while converting images.
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Jonathan Wienke

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Polarizing Filters and digital cameras
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2003, 06:23:38 PM »

Just remember that you must use circular polarizers on DSLRs, or it jacks up the in-camera metering and autofocus.
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