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Author Topic: Recent Professional Works  (Read 1249566 times)

haefnerphoto

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4100 on: January 12, 2013, 09:52:18 PM »

Kodachrome 64 Pro converted to b/white.

Client: Hewden/Stuart Group plc.

Rob C

Love it!!

SecondFocus

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4101 on: January 12, 2013, 10:43:40 PM »

This really is superb!

Kodachrome 64 Pro converted to b/white.

Client: Hewden/Stuart Group plc.

Rob C
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Kirk Gittings

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4102 on: January 12, 2013, 10:59:06 PM »

Amazing the feedback a couple of perky nipples will get :)
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Kirk

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SecondFocus

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4103 on: January 12, 2013, 11:10:09 PM »

Actually I am just in awe of the tonality of the black and white conversion from Kodachrome. It is just beautiful!

And it is exactly my kind of subject matter :)

Amazing the feedback a couple of perky nipples will get :)

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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4104 on: January 12, 2013, 11:35:17 PM »

Amazing the feedback a couple of perky nipples will get :)

Makes one wonder why architects doon't put a couple on every building.  ;D
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Kirk Gittings

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4105 on: January 12, 2013, 11:54:07 PM »

Makes one wonder why architects doon't put a couple on every building.  ;D


:)
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Kirk

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Rob C

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4106 on: January 13, 2013, 05:27:22 AM »

Makes one wonder why architects doon't put a couple on every building.  ;D




Look at the Carlton in Cannes and the Negresco in Nice.

;-)

Rob C

Rob C

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4107 on: January 13, 2013, 05:35:30 AM »

Thanks, haef 'n' Second; praise indeed from you guys!

Yes, I've often thought that in the right light, Kodachrome was preferrable to any b/w film for the look that I currently like in b/w prints. Partly, I think it's down to the exposure methodology used: incident light readings based on retaining important highlights. The problem I face converting from Kodachrome is scanning: I'm not very clever with that, and have a simple CanoScan which I'm sure I don't use to its best advantage, as it is.

Oh well, it was all fun whilst it lasted!

Thanks again,

Rob C
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 05:37:57 AM by Rob C »
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Rob C

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4108 on: January 13, 2013, 10:07:36 AM »

Thank you, Keith; it owes a lot to the model, Denise Denny.

Unusual sort of beauty, and amazing actual sex-appeal. We were staying in a small Nassau hotel (Pilot House) near the Paradise Island Bridge, and I remember one evening when she, the other girl (probably more pretty) and my wife and I walked into the bar. I can tell you (though I didn't really notice at the time) that my wife later informed me that every eye in that place was instantly drawn to Denise.

The things women can notice in an instant.

Rob C

ChristopherBarrett

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4109 on: January 13, 2013, 05:16:21 PM »

You basically setup all your lights before sunset? It's very difficult to setup lights for a night scene when working in daylight, because you can't exactly see what the lights are doing. Plus when the perfect sunset moment comes I find my self scrambling to adjust lights before missing out the sky view.  One thing I thought about to counter this problem is to 1. setup the camera and prepare the space in advance 2. capture the perfect window view  3. adjust the lights without worrying about the time 4. add the window view in post.

Abdul, the best way to handle that is to cover all the windows with black while setting up the shot.  Then you can get the light level perfect.  In a traditional dusk view like this, you should be getting almost no ambient daylight when you finally expose.  We typically uncover the windows 30-40 minutes prior to dusk and spend that time hiding reflections.  When the window reaches the desirable brightness level you should be ready to go.

Cheers,
CB
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pixjohn

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4110 on: January 13, 2013, 09:59:51 PM »

I just use experience shooting dusk. Years of lighting I can guesstimate what light, how much if any scrims  and when its time to shoot, just tweak the lights.
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Abdulrahman Aljabri

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4111 on: January 14, 2013, 01:23:37 AM »

Abdul, the best way to handle that is to cover all the windows with black while setting up the shot.  Then you can get the light level perfect.  In a traditional dusk view like this, you should be getting almost no ambient daylight when you finally expose.  We typically uncover the windows 30-40 minutes prior to dusk and spend that time hiding reflections.  When the window reaches the desirable brightness level you should be ready to go.

Cheers,
CB

Thanks this is a great tip, is there any particular materiel you find best to use as a cover? I am thinking about trying your suggestion with the black plastic bags made for large garbage containers; cheap and light.

I just use experience shooting dusk. Years of lighting I can guesstimate what light, how much if any scrims  and when its time to shoot, just tweak the lights.

I can see this working in typical spaces like standard hotel bedrooms, but for challenging irregular spaces this will not work. 
« Last Edit: January 14, 2013, 01:26:34 AM by Abdulrahman Aljabri »
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Rob C

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4112 on: January 14, 2013, 06:33:41 AM »

Thanks this is a great tip, is there any particular materiel you find best to use as a cover? I am thinking about trying your suggestion with the black plastic bags made for large garbage containers; cheap and light.
I can see this working in typical spaces like standard hotel bedrooms, but for challenging irregular spaces this will not work. 



Won't they pick up shine that might still be apparent when you make the exterior exposure? Plastic has highlights, black or not, if light hits it.

Rob C

Abdulrahman Aljabri

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4113 on: January 14, 2013, 06:49:10 AM »



Won't they pick up shine that might still be apparent when you make the exterior exposure? Plastic has highlights, black or not, if light hits it.

Rob C

I am not sure, why would that be a problem? If they are being used just to block the light from the outside until it gets dark, would it make a difference if they show reflections?
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MY SITE: ALJABRI MEDIA PRODUCTION

Abdulrahman - and yes its a long name but has a meaning "servant of the merciful". you can also call me abdul

Rob C

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4114 on: January 14, 2013, 09:50:53 AM »

I am not sure, why would that be a problem? If they are being used just to block the light from the outside until it gets dark, would it make a difference if they show reflections?


Maybe I'm stuck thinking transparency and in-camera double exposure. Guess digital manipulation is a ballgame that I seldom think much about beyond the straight picture.

Mea culpa.

Rob C

Kumar

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4115 on: January 14, 2013, 10:21:24 AM »

Black plastic would cause problems, if there are other reflective objects that pick up those reflections. I've used this technique, and the easiest solution is to use black flocked paper sheets. They're easy to carry and use.

Kumar

Scott Hargis

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4116 on: January 14, 2013, 11:54:06 AM »

I'm pretty sure that Chris is not talking about multiple exposures or digital manipulation. He's saying you black out the windows during setup so that you can replicate the conditions that will exist when you make the final shot (after the sun has gone down).

I've never worked that way, but I carry several very large pieces of black poly poplin cloth (10' x 20') that I can block windows with. Garbage bags would be fine, but a pain in the ass. Once you've figured out your lighting, remove the window coverings and wait for mother nature to take care of the rest, then push the button on top of the camera. Finished photo.

In the shot I posted, that would have been *really* hard to do; it's floor-to-ceiling glass on two sides. But I had a pretty good idea of what I wanted and I was very close on my first try. I ran the shutter speed up to kill most of the ambient so I could see what my lights were doing. Hardest thing to deal with was the black granite column on the right edge. And the coolest thing my assistant ever did for me was running a skinny strip of black gaff tape up the shaft of the floor lamp so it didn't reflect in the glass as a distracting vertical line.

Back story: This place was originally shot by Mary Nichols for AD in 1999. It's been sold, gutted, and re-done (by my client) but the coffee table was considered too heavy to move, so it appears (along with the view, of course) in both mine and Mary's photos, which is kind of fun. Hard to tell in my photo, but that's the AD re-print of the article on the round table under the bowl of almonds.

jsch

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4117 on: January 15, 2013, 05:01:50 PM »

Kodachrome 64 Pro converted to b/white.

Client: Hewden/Stuart Group plc.

Rob C

Hi Rob,

to change a recent song: "She's sexy and she knows it."

You are a lucky man. Today you won't be out with the three girls alone. There would be a design director, an art director, perhaps a deputy art director, a deputy photo editor, some more photo editors and designers and a few more iPhone pinchers and Blackberry button pushers. Oh, I forgot – a director of photography (this is perhaps the photographer).

I like your image(s) a lot. Where you a part of the black boys group from the east end? – – Brian D – – David B – – Terence D – and – Rob C?

Best,
Johannes




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Rob C

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4118 on: January 15, 2013, 05:52:18 PM »

Hi Rob,

to change a recent song: "She's sexy and she knows it."

You are a lucky man. Today you won't be out with the three girls alone. There would be a design director, an art director, perhaps a deputy art director, a deputy photo editor, some more photo editors and designers and a few more iPhone pinchers and Blackberry button pushers. Oh, I forgot – a director of photography (this is perhaps the photographer).

I like your image(s) a lot. Where you a part of the black boys group from the east end? – – Brian D – – David B – – Terence D – and – Rob C?

Best,
Johannes


Hi Johannes,

Thanks for the compliments, but sorry to disappoint: Rob C was alive, of an age with, and working at the same time, but up north in the distant Scottish mists and not the fourth musketeer in any trinity!

It would have been nice to go south, but the problem was the same as faced most folks not already living in the London area: property values. I’d a nice home in Glasgow; eventually we closed the rented studio and added on a studio to the house, and all of that would probably only have bought us a garage in London. With a wife and two kids, there was never any way I was going to risk effing up their lives on a wilder ego trip than I was already on. In fact, I came to appreciate being where I was because I did manage to carve myself a pleasant clientele that allowed a lot of delightful work opportunities – as can be seen from the calendar stuff on the website. Unfortunately, I did a Duffy and destroyed the entire fashion work that I couldn’t sell back to clients when we were leaving to live in Spain. It simply never entered my mind that one day it could be interesting beyond the job itself. I did far more fashion work early on than I ever did calendars, which happened in the later years of my career, so most of my life’s work is lost forever. That’s one thing about the digital age: you learn that pictures can have many lives and to destroy nothing!

Yes, the ‘team’ way that shoots follow nowadays had already started to happen more or less as my commercial work drew to a close; I didn’t like it at all, and to  be brutaly honest, it wasn’t a system in which I could do anything much – I more or less need to be alone with the people in the shots or I get distracted, confused, short-tempered and feel like telling the others to just bloody do it themselves. Not clever business, but how it works for me. Yet it’s strange: as budgets supposedly get tighter, more people go out to do the same job than were ever needed before! I watched Helmut Newton say more or less the same thing on tv, that photography had become so expensive that everything (that had once been pure fun) had become such a big deal.

Ciao –

Rob C
« Last Edit: January 15, 2013, 05:54:22 PM by Rob C »
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pixjohn

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #4119 on: January 15, 2013, 06:18:37 PM »

I do it all the time indoors and out at dusk so it must work!

Thanks this is a great tip, is there any particular materiel you find best to use as a cover? I am thinking about trying your suggestion with the black plastic bags made for large garbage containers; cheap and light.

I can see this working in typical spaces like standard hotel bedrooms, but for challenging irregular spaces this will not work. 
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