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Author Topic: Recent Professional Works  (Read 1244737 times)

uaiomex

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3840 on: October 03, 2012, 11:04:50 PM »

Dios mo Michael! This is your best ever!
Eduardo

:) Here is another one from the series:


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uaiomex

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3841 on: October 03, 2012, 11:10:14 PM »

You are getting better by the minute!
Eduardo
Here is a little more kick to the theme:




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bcooter

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3842 on: October 04, 2012, 03:42:29 AM »


Contax p21+

BC
« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 03:46:35 AM by bcooter »
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KLaban

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3843 on: October 04, 2012, 05:31:36 AM »

Just back from a trip to Greece. Amongst the projects was a planned shoot at Lovokomeio, the former leprosy colony and hospital in Chios. The colony which was founded by the Genoese in 1378 is the oldest medical facility in Greece. Destroyed by an earthquake in 1881 and rebuilt in 1909 it was eventually abandoned in 1959. Mixed emotions on the shoot, above all I felt the presence of the patients.

Before effective treatment became available the social stigma was such that there was little alternative to the colonies. Lovokomeio was partially funded by The Red Cross and provided much needed treatment and care. It was regarded as a progressive model for such communities. The colony is virtually unknown and has been left to decay. Thankfully it is no longer needed, but sadly the colonies persist elsewhere.



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« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 05:33:57 AM by KLaban »
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Dick Roadnight

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3844 on: October 04, 2012, 05:55:03 AM »



Kitchen detail. Exposed for halogens over stove, lit the cabinets, foreground. Gelled the undercabinet fluorescents a full cut of minus green.
It is nice to read that someone does it properly ... getting it right in camera.

Have you tried shooting different light sources in different shots and profiling, light balancing or post-processing each light source?
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MichaelEzra

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3845 on: October 04, 2012, 09:56:42 AM »

Thanks, Eduardo:)

@Dick, you are correct that gravity is acting downwards. I used a single cushioned support under the model's body that was removed in post with a single fill-in. You are lucky to have access to gymnasts! Most of the models I work with are in a very good physical shape, but are not gymnasts; there was only one in 2002. I wish I could find a contortionist to work with...

@Scott - very clean lighting, great job! Have you tried using Oloneo HRD relight (http://www.oloneo.com/en/page/products/photoengine/hdr-relight.html)? It allows to create a lighting composite based on individual frames, each shot using a separate light source.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 10:07:03 AM by MichaelEzra »
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Scott Hargis

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3846 on: October 04, 2012, 11:09:18 AM »

Thanks for the comments, everyone. Michael, I'm really blown away by this recent set of nudes you've posted.

I prefer not to do compositing unless I simply cannot accomplish the shot otherwise. I like to have the shot pretty thoroughly pre-visualized, and I personally find it difficult to keep track of too many "parts" when I'm building a shot towards that vision. I also work with clients who want to see and approve the shot on location, and I wouldn't want to ask them to "imagine" the final result. Realities of commercial photography sometimes dictate a window replacement, etc., but for the most part I find it faster, easier, and much better image quality to just get it in-camera.

ACH DIGITAL

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3847 on: October 05, 2012, 10:33:27 AM »

I agree with Scott, it's more professional to do it in camera, although sometimes it could be painful.

To complement the above comments I would suggest avoiding the blue light (daylight) hitting the right side of the steel parts.

It could be intentional but I think it contaminates the very clean otherwise. Just desaturating the blue would be enough.

ACH
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Antonio Chagin
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ACH DIGITAL

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3848 on: October 05, 2012, 10:35:45 AM »

Do you think I would get sue for using this image as a self promotional piece?

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Kirk Gittings

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3849 on: October 05, 2012, 10:40:58 AM »

I agree with Scott, it's more professional to do it in camera, although sometimes it could be painful.

To complement the above comments I would suggest avoiding the blue light (daylight) hitting the right side of the steel parts.

It could be intentional but I think it contaminates the very clean otherwise. Just desaturating the blue would be enough.

ACH

I completely disagree. The blue keys the slight warmth in the image and also sets the image apart as a real world design ie location shot instead of the ubiquitous studio manufacturers tile/plumbing/cabinetry shot.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2012, 10:57:18 AM by Kirk Gittings »
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Thanks,
Kirk

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ACH DIGITAL

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3850 on: October 05, 2012, 10:47:05 AM »

Thanks Kirk, something to learn. ACH
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Antonio Chagin
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Kirk Gittings

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3851 on: October 05, 2012, 11:05:03 AM »

Architecture in the real world is never perfect. IMO if you PS/Light it whatever till it looks absolutely perfect it starts to look like a rendering or a staged studio set. In real architecture there are lot of distracting things that need to be fixed/lit in shot or in post-but take it to far and it starts to look fake. That is what I don't like about some contemporary fashion photography. The women look like mannequins with skin like the Pillsbury Dough Boy-about as interesting as a Stepford Wife.

Now much of the architecture/interiors I shoot have multiple uses for a client such as portfolio, editorial submissions and design competitions. The later two require some real world veracity and my considerable skills at "fixing" things have to be held in check. Showing mixed lighting is a part of that.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2012, 11:10:20 AM by Kirk Gittings »
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Thanks,
Kirk

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LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)

ACH DIGITAL

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3852 on: October 05, 2012, 11:14:47 AM »

The line that defines what is acceptable and what is not in Architectural Photography is what takes longer to master. Thanks for sharing your experiences. ACH
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Antonio Chagin
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KLaban

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3853 on: October 05, 2012, 11:51:20 AM »

At times when viewing this thread one could be forgiven for thinking it's a virtual world.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2012, 12:42:36 PM by KLaban »
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ACH DIGITAL

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3854 on: October 05, 2012, 03:38:22 PM »

It is just Professional Photography in the Digital World.
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Antonio Chagin
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george2787

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3855 on: October 05, 2012, 04:53:15 PM »


Contax p21+

BC


Bcooter, is he photoshopped in? I'm feeling it a little strange. But love the general ambient.
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MichaelEzra

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3856 on: October 05, 2012, 08:19:36 PM »

The character, light and post, all look very coherent.

David Eichler

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3857 on: October 05, 2012, 08:23:39 PM »

I agree with Scott, it's more professional to do it in camera, although sometimes it could be painful.

To complement the above comments I would suggest avoiding the blue light (daylight) hitting the right side of the steel parts.

It could be intentional but I think it contaminates the very clean otherwise. Just desaturating the blue would be enough.

ACH

In my opinion, it is only the end results that matters to the viewer. With all of the tools digital provides, I don't see why one method is more professional than another, unless, as Scott points out, you need to show an on-site client something that is pretty close to the finished result. Techniques such as Scott uses work fine for his style, clientele and temperment, but I would not want to be limited to just "getting it right" in camera when digital offers so many additional creative and problem-solving opportunities. In the end, though, what I still prefer above all is great ambient lighting, often just daylight. I just dont think you can beat the sun as a light source.

As for the blue reflections in Scott's photo, I like them because I think they provide a bit of color contrast. Nothing wrong with blue color casts, in my opinion, if used appropriately to suggest blue sky reflections or twilight.

Kind of curious, these days, for still photography, how many are correcting mixed lighting at the source, as opposed to later on in post?
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ACH DIGITAL

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3858 on: October 05, 2012, 10:41:09 PM »

In my opinion, it is only the end results that matters to the viewer. With all of the tools digital provides, I don't see why one method is more professional than another, unless, as Scott points out, you need to show an on-site client something that is pretty close to the finished result. Techniques such as Scott uses work fine for his style, clientele and temperment, but I would not want to be limited to just "getting it right" in camera when digital offers so many additional creative and problem-solving opportunities. In the end, though, what I still prefer above all is great ambient lighting, often just daylight. I just dont think you can beat the sun as a light source.

As for the blue reflections in Scott's photo, I like them because I think they provide a bit of color contrast. Nothing wrong with blue color casts, in my opinion, if used appropriately to suggest blue sky reflections or twilight.

Kind of curious, these days, for still photography, how many are correcting mixed lighting at the source, as opposed to later on in post?

Well two different questions. First as you all know, what you see in location is not what the camera sees, so the quotation that t is natural" doesn't really is. When you see a slight tint of blue in real live it translate into a deep blue as you are balancing for tungsten. So it is never natural.
In my case if I can deal with it in camera at location, is faster and easier. If I can not then I'd do it in post.

Some clients allow for more natural reflections and mix lighting, others just don't allow for it. Some clients like little retouching, others ask for a lot.

The problem with mix lighting is that, as I said before was not that intense in real as it shows in film or digital. So for me in this case I would try to avoid or lower its intensity at location or in post, what ever is handy to me.
See this example, first the untouched image then the final. That blue was never like that for real, so it has to be solved.



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Antonio Chagin
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David Eichler

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Re: Recent Professional Works
« Reply #3859 on: October 06, 2012, 01:17:42 AM »

Well two different questions. First as you all know, what you see in location is not what the camera sees, so the quotation that t is natural" doesn't really is. When you see a slight tint of blue in real live it translate into a deep blue as you are balancing for tungsten. So it is never natural.
In my case if I can deal with it in camera at location, is faster and easier. If I can not then I'd do it in post.

Some clients allow for more natural reflections and mix lighting, others just don't allow for it. Some clients like little retouching, others ask for a lot.

The problem with mix lighting is that, as I said before was not that intense in real as it shows in film or digital. So for me in this case I would try to avoid or lower its intensity at location or in post, what ever is handy to me.
See this example, first the untouched image then the final. That blue was never like that for real, so it has to be solved.




I don't disagree with anything you said in this quote. In your example, the real daylight was probably a bit cool looking to the naked eye (if not as cool as the "before" example), but that would not be the best look for this photo, so you went with something that was not what the naked eye saw, to make a better photo. With other subjects and combinations of colors, it might be a different story, in my opinion, and of course the client's desires matter too.

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