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Author Topic: Slimy Vis Files  (Read 6592 times)

tjphototx

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Slimy Vis Files
« on: September 17, 2008, 08:21:04 PM »

I have many boxes full of Vis Files with row upon
row of 35mm and 6x6 Chromes dating back 20
years. They were in a climate controlled storage
unit until I decided it was time to clean house.
Many of the slide pages are very slimy, gooey, and sticky.
Most of the chromes are damaged or destroyed from
the reaction of the plastic in these file sheets.
I might be able to scan and retouch.
I don't see any mention of the Vis Files being
archival so I can assume they aren't. Has anyone
else had this problem?
Also, any advice on how to destroy, en masse, this
many chromes and sheets. Should I call a shredding
company?
Thanks for any advice.
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Photo_Utopia

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Slimy Vis Files
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2008, 01:20:43 PM »

I'm not sure what a Vis file is but it doesn't sound good.
I have always used archival storage from either Kenro or Panodia called Diapacs and have all my slides from the late '70's they are OK.
As for disposal try your local authority who should guide you.

Storage is vital, film or digital.
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Rob C

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Slimy Vis Files
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2008, 10:52:07 AM »

I use Diane Wyllie Super Archival Viewpacks. They have not let me down yet with stuff from the 70s...

Rob C

mrportr8

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Slimy Vis Files
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2008, 10:09:06 PM »

It sounds like plastisizer migration. The plastisizer is an additive that makes a plastic soft and pliable. Over time it can migrate to the surface and make the plastic seem oily or sticky.
Peace,
Scott W.
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Rob C

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Slimy Vis Files
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2008, 08:35:51 AM »

Quote from: mrportr8
It sounds like plastisizer migration. The plastisizer is an additive that makes a plastic soft and pliable. Over time it can migrate to the surface and make the plastic seem oily or sticky.
Peace,
Scott W.



Is that the same phenomenon that sometimes happens with flash cables? Ive still got a large, venerable Metz unit and the black cables are decidely sticky - most unpleasant too.

Rob C

mrportr8

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Slimy Vis Files
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2008, 04:25:57 PM »

Quote from: Rob C
Is that the same phenomenon that sometimes happens with flash cables? Ive still got a large, venerable Metz unit and the black cables are decidely sticky - most unpleasant too.

Rob C

Yep. Same cause.
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