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Author Topic: Recreating History with Lego  (Read 2328 times)

wolfnowl

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Recreating History with Lego
« on: June 23, 2008, 04:57:20 PM »

From John Paul Caponigro's blog, here: http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/wordpress/?p=32

"Greg Heisler and I recently discussed how hard it is to make your own pictures and not fall prey to making pictures of other pictures. In this case, itís downright funny. Mike Stimpsonís recreations are highly entertaining."

Worth looking at...

Mike.
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Rob C

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Recreating History with Lego
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2008, 05:22:32 PM »

Quote
From John Paul Caponigro's blog, here: http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/wordpress/?p=32

"Greg Heisler and I recently discussed how hard it is to make your own pictures and not fall prey to making pictures of other pictures. In this case, itís downright funny. Mike Stimpsonís recreations are highly entertaining."

Worth looking at...

Mike.
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Yes, there is a funny side to playing plastic HC-B, but there is a grimmer reality to the game: it only works because we are aware of the difficulty in finding newer ground of our own.

But a funny thing about the picture, the original one, is that the television "guides" who talk us through such work always fail to spot something even more important about it: far from being an off-the-cuff piece of work, if they were to pay more attention to what lies under their noses, they would see that HC-B actually worked a mirror photograph of the poster next to the double Railowsky copy on the left of the frame, along the fence. Look at the figurine within the 9.

But then, pundits just donīt have the time for detail, poor things, too busy moving on to the next big show...

Be that as it may, it often seems to me that original work is now largely impossible to do. Every genre has been done to death, even death itself. Perhaps the plastifiction of women was the last gasp of the fashion and cosmetics industry, its final throw at doing something new before settling down into old-age and possibly facing the same ending to a hegemonic period as has arrived unbid on the doorsteps of the music industry.

What a fun-filled future awaits!

Rob C
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