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Author Topic: Tripod for hiking  (Read 7259 times)

Sigi

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Tripod for hiking
« on: February 29, 2008, 05:57:20 PM »

Hello,
I am a serious amateur photographer and I am looking for my first tripod. I shoot a lot of landscape and weight is of utmost importance for me - I want to take the tripod on hiking trips in very remote areas and for extended trekking trips in the mountains - sometimes for weeks in a row. I don#t mind spending money as I am looking for quality. I would also like some recommendations on ballheads. I found the site of Really Right Stuff but thought I check here with the experts first.


I have a 40 D and my heaviest lens is the 70-200mm/2.8

Thanks for any advice.


Sigi

sbacon

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #1 on: February 29, 2008, 06:04:54 PM »

I do a lot of my photo work on the trail, hiking and backpacking. I highly recommend the RRS BH-40 LR II. And it is a perfect compliment (IMHO) to my trusty Gitzo G1228. The combination is solid and lightweight - just 4.5 lbs. with the Gitzo short column.
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dchew

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #2 on: February 29, 2008, 06:47:21 PM »

I second the 1228, which is now the 2540 (I think).

It used to be there was only one ballhead of choice, the Arca Swiss.  Now there are several:  RRS, Arca Swiss, Markins, Kirk, etc.  I don't think you would be disapointed with either of those.

Just be sure to use either RRS or Kirk plates.  They make the entire mechanism successfull.  

Dave Chew
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Thomas Krüger

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2008, 02:29:10 AM »

I use the Gitzo 2540LVL with a Markins Q10 ballhead. The camera is mounted with a Kirk L-plate. If you put also the Kirk Long Rail Plate LRP-1 in your bag you can also shot horizontal panoramas.
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Sigi

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2008, 02:30:23 AM »

Thank you for your advice

pete_truman

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2008, 05:19:44 AM »

I have bought a succession of tripods to take on long hikes and have found that all but one of them have just stayed at home given they were so heavy. The last tripod I bought (about 10 months ago) was the Gitzo Traveller GT1550T and this is always packed in my rucksack as it is so light. It has a ball head included but is not the tripod to try to support a really large camera and big lenses. I have used it with my Canon 5D and 70-200mm lens without problems but would feel uncomfortable using it with a 1D. Its not the cheapest tripod but I wish I had bought one years ago - I would have saved the cost of the other tripods I now have scattered around my house and back of the car!
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Pete Truman

Marsupilami

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2008, 05:39:56 AM »

Try the Slik carbon tripods, very reliable and small and lightweight (1000 gramms). and they go down to the ground for makro work too.
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Sigi

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2008, 03:13:09 PM »

Quote
I use the Gitzo 2540LVL with a Markins Q10 ballhead. The camera is mounted with a Kirk L-plate. If you put also the Kirk Long Rail Plate LRP-1 in your bag you can also shot horizontal panoramas.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=178390\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Thomas,

why can't I shoot panoramas with the normal L-plate?

Sigi

gdanmitchell

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2008, 01:56:04 PM »

I also spend significant time on foot in the mountains doing photography - often including Sierra Nevada range backpacking trips of a week or more that take me over trailless alpine passes with a full pack.

When I'm not hiking I use a pretty substantial and large tripod. For backpacking I've been using a Velbon 540 El Carmagne carbon-fiber tripod. It is relatively light and collapses enough to attach to the outside of my backpack. I use the excellent Acratech ballhead. It will work just fine with the lens you mentioned and it only weighs about one pound.

Backpacking tripods are going to be a compromise in one way or another. Carry the same hefty tripod that you would use for non-trail use and you'll be saddled with substantial weight - in addition to that of the rest of your photo gear. Get one of the mini tripods and it will be a lot easier to carry, but you'll frequently find that it just isn't substantial enough. My setup is a good compromise for me - the only real shortcoming is, ahem, the shortness of the fully extended tripod.

Dan

 
Quote
Hello,
I am a serious amateur photographer and I am looking for my first tripod. I shoot a lot of landscape and weight is of utmost importance for me - I want to take the tripod on hiking trips in very remote areas and for extended trekking trips in the mountains - sometimes for weeks in a row. I don#t mind spending money as I am looking for quality. I would also like some recommendations on ballheads. I found the site of Really Right Stuff but thought I check here with the experts first.
I have a 40 D and my heaviest lens is the 70-200mm/2.8

Thanks for any advice.
Sigi
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=178318\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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G Dan Mitchell
SF Bay Area, California, USA

BernardLanguillier

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2008, 11:19:56 PM »

I am very pleased with Gitzo 3 sections carbon tripod. Expensive, but totally reliable, rugged and light.

I would personnally recommend 3 sections tripods over their 4 sections equivalents unless small size when not in used is important for you (like if you fly often and/or between countries where the security of checked luggages is uncertain).

3 sections tripod are more rigid, are faster to fold/unfold, are often higher and typially less prone to failure (like freezing of the joints for instance).

Cheers,
Bernard
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Sigi

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2008, 01:42:04 AM »

Quote
I am very pleased with Gitzo 3 sections carbon tripod. Expensive, but totally reliable, rugged and light.

I would personnally recommend 3 sections tripods over their 4 sections equivalents unless small size when not in used is important for you (like if you fly often and/or between countries where the security of checked luggages is uncertain).

3 sections tripod are more rigid, are faster to fold/unfold, are often higher and typially less prone to failure (like freezing of the joints for instance).

Cheers,
Bernard
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=178777\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Bernard,

I have to carry it on my daypack when I am trekking. Which one do you recommend 4 sections or 3 sections?

Thanks

Sigi

BernardLanguillier

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2008, 03:22:28 AM »

Quote
Bernard,

I have to carry it on my daypack when I am trekking. Which one do you recommend 4 sections or 3 sections?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=178787\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

It depends on your day pack.

My day pack is a 44L Osprey that can take my 3 section Gitzo without problems, but most people would probably consider this pack to be too large (although it is very light at 1.1 kg).

Cheers,
Bernard
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Sigi

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2008, 07:54:00 AM »

Quote
It depends on your day pack.

My day pack is a 44L Osprey that can take my 3 section Gitzo without problems, but most people would probably consider this pack to be too large (although it is very light at 1.1 kg).

Cheers,
Bernard
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=178797\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Bernard,

which tripod are you using exactly from Gitzo.

Sigi

PS: I also saw that you are looking for something to charge your batteries. I have found a 12 V charger for batteries. I will be at home in the evening and look which brand.

BernardLanguillier

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2008, 08:27:25 AM »

Quote
Bernard,

which tripod are you using exactly from Gitzo.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=178832\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

A Gitzo 1257 I believe.

Cheers,
Bernard
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micek

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #14 on: March 03, 2008, 11:34:55 AM »

Check Feisol's tripod range (feisol.com). They are exceptionally light, sturdy, compact and affordable.
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David Hufford

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Tripod for hiking
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2008, 10:37:35 PM »

"I have to carry it on my daypack when I am trekking. Which one do you recommend 4 sections or 3 sections?"

Another point that you may want to consider in 3 vs 4 sections is speed of setup. For those who are able to plan every shot, this may be less important, but for me in nature, wildlife, or landscape photography, I often encounter opportunities where a tripod is needed and I only have seconds to get it set up (e.g. quickly changing light). It is a lot faster to loosen and tighten 9 joints than it is 12.

I usually prefer legs with the "snap-locks" (I forget the term) over twist-locks because of speed. However, I have found that I can set up a 3-section Gitzo GT1930 NEARLY as fast as I can  my old Velbon 4-section with snap-locks. The additional length of the Gitzo has not bothered me when carrying it on a backpack. I don't often go through heavy brush with it either, which could cause trouble if it stuck up too far and snagged on trees or brush.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2008, 10:23:24 PM by drichi »
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