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Author Topic: Placement in local galleries  (Read 3709 times)

kaelaria

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Placement in local galleries
« on: February 19, 2008, 12:09:03 AM »

What is the best approach for finding local galleries that will either show, sell or sell on consignment, your work?  Is there a good listing site or set of procedures to follow, starting out?

If it's down to simply pulling out the yellow pages and paying a visit - what are the expected preparations and procedures?

Thanks!

PSA DC-9-30

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Placement in local galleries
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2008, 04:36:20 AM »

This is something I've been wondering about myself.

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Placement in local galleries
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2008, 10:29:41 AM »

Here are a few suggestions that have been made to me by others who have been successful:

1.   Visit some galleries and find two or three that seem to show work that is of the same general calibre and type as your own. Visiting websites can help.

2.   Find out as much as you can about the tastes and prejudices of the gallery owners. See if their websites say anything about their submission preferences.

3.   Prepare a targeted portfolio of your best work. As has been mentioned elsewhere, gallery owners seem to prefer themes to variety, so if you have 20 really good images of old trashcans (for example), it is better to show all 20 of them than to show one trashcan, one baby picture, one beautiful landscape, etc.

4.   Some gallery owners want you to leave a CD or a portfolio with them and they'll call you when they have looked at it. Others want you to make an appointment to sit down with them to look over your work.  Some gallery owners want to see finished prints and won't look at anything digital, while others prefer jpegs. Again, learning what you can about their prejudices before you go in can make a difference.

5.   Your work should be easy to look at. For example, twenty to thirty prints of letter/A4 size in a nice portfolio case, plus one or two examples in the size you prefer to display is easy to evaluate.

6.   Titles or no titles? "Giclee" or "Ink jet"? These preferences can often be determined by looking at the current exhibit at the gallery.

7.   Don't push technical information unless asked for it. If you are asked, have it handy.

8.   If possible, talk to someone who is already represented by that galley.


I hope this helps a little. And I'll let you know if and when I find the gallery of my dreams. You do the same, please.
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http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my photo website. New images each season. Also visit my new website: http://ericneedsakidney.org

printmaker

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Placement in local galleries
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2008, 01:35:13 AM »

two names that stick out to me...

(quickly hit up galleries by state/city)
http://www.infolinknetwork.com/search/inde.../United_States/

(artist resource site)
http://www.artpromote.com/


*not sure if this is what you were asking about exactly but even if one person finds the link helpfull then thats good enough for me*
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Nora151

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Placement in local galleries
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2008, 09:27:48 AM »

Good question and thanks to the responses.
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When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant
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