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Author Topic: contrejour  (Read 4418 times)

Jonathan Wienke

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contrejour
« on: January 16, 2003, 02:11:56 PM »

If you can put the camera on a tripod and have a computer, then take bracketed exposures, scan the negatives, and put the best parts of each shot together in Photoshop to make one final excellently exposed and detailed image.

Peter McLennan

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contrejour
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2003, 07:33:44 PM »

Virgil wrote: "I was concerned about the direction of the light. Some of the most beautiful lanscapes were marvellously lit but the sight was coming towards me..."

Virgil, when the light is coming towards the camera, that is called "Backlight".  For landscape photographers, it is also often called "Gold".  Backlight is wonderful. Backlight is desireable. Learn to shoot with backlight and you will make good pictures.  

Others have suggested that you "bracket" your exposures.  I would also suggest that you "record" your brackets.  That way, you will learn faster.

Peter
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virgilm

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contrejour
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2002, 12:00:41 PM »

[font color=\'#000000\']Again, dear friends I bother you with a new topic, but what can I do since this site seems to me like Ali Baba's cavern?
As I was shooting the three rolls during my short trip to the north of the country I was concerned about the direction of the light. Some of the most beautiful lanscapes were marvellously lit but the sight was coming towards me and it was impossible to move-I was on a river, in a gorge. I still wanted to take those pictures but didn't know how to expose. Of course, I went to see my old friend, a photographer, he is over 70, but he said 'Don't do that yet, it's too soon for you!'
Even if I agree with him I would still like to try. What do you think about that? [/font]
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Rainer SLP

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contrejour
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2002, 11:26:32 AM »

[font color=\'#000000\']Hi Virgil,

That is not your friend. Forget him.

I do not know his Photography but from that answer I guess he has problems too in achieving good contrejour photographies.

Deriving from his answer I assume that he is also not a good teacher.

I think that teaching is an art of passing experience to somebody else which does not make you poorer. It makes you richer.

Being able to teach something is a gift which not everybody has.

If everybody would think like this, we still would be hanging on trees and howling around.

Take your your camera and go out shooting. Measure the light on your object, make some bracketing, but most important shoot, shoot and shoot. If from 10 rolls you get 1 frame you like it already was worth that Photography.

10 rolls at US 5,00 + development at 5,00 gives total US $ 100,00. Is not that Photography you like, worth that?[/font]
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Thanks and regards Rainer

I am here for learning and having fun and maybe sometimes I take life too serious, but then I think I will never get alive out of it and it passes away ...

Tim Gray

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contrejour
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2003, 04:09:13 PM »

As Michael R has mentioned, getting a precise registration between 2 scanned negatives can be a bit tricky
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