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Author Topic: Taking Phtos through windows  (Read 8454 times)

YogiMo

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Taking Phtos through windows
« on: June 30, 2007, 09:48:21 PM »

Taking photos through windows for sure is not ideal, but sometimes you have no choice. Is there any trick to get rid of the mirrow effect, basically seeing yourself, or parts of the room in the glass of the window?
Appreciate any ideas,
best regards
York
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Tim Gray

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Taking Phtos through windows
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2007, 07:32:32 AM »

Quote
Taking photos through windows for sure is not ideal, but sometimes you have no choice. Is there any trick to get rid of the mirrow effect, basically seeing yourself, or parts of the room in the glass of the window?
Appreciate any ideas,
best regards
York
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=125816\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Take off the lens shade and actually touch the edge of the lens to the glass.  The trick is to get the front element as close to the glass as possible.
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YogiMo

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Taking Phtos through windows
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2007, 07:40:34 AM »

Thanks Tim, I will try it, sometimes you want to take a picture from an airplane or you are stuck on some TV tower, again not ideal, but something you want to remember, thanks & best regards York
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BernardLanguillier

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Taking Phtos through windows
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2007, 07:56:11 AM »

Besides the excellent advice already provided, you can also use a view camera veil with a black inner surface.

The camera should be on a tripod. Depending on the light condition outside, this works perfect (when it is dark outside) or not that great (very bright outside).

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!

PSA DC-9-30

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Taking Phtos through windows
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2007, 02:26:01 AM »

Interesting question. Actually, there are many types of glass, along with various coatings, as well as plastics that look like glass. From experience, I can tell you that they do not all behave the same way. For example, I find that shooting through an airplane window poses few problems, but shooting through glass at an airport terminal often causes a lot of problems (blurring, reflections, etc.)

I believe the use of a polarizing filter will help to minimize reflections by excluding off-axis light waves.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2007, 02:27:52 AM by PSA DC-9-30 »
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Taking Phtos through windows
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2007, 03:07:33 AM »

One more trick is to place a dark sheet (plastic etc) 90 degrees to the window and place the camera lens next to it where the reflections are blocked. I use the sunshade in the cockpit which works well (dark green)
Here is a shot using the dark sheet of plastic trick
Marc
[attachment=2721:attachment]
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Marc McCalmont

Chris_T

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Taking Phtos through windows
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2007, 07:11:29 AM »

This book will both inspire you and provide you with many answers:

http://www.amazon.com/Window-Seat-Photogra...83460857&sr=8-2

Quote
Thanks Tim, I will try it, sometimes you want to take a picture from an airplane or you are stuck on some TV tower, again not ideal, but something you want to remember, thanks & best regards York
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PSA DC-9-30

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Taking Phtos through windows
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2007, 09:48:01 AM »

Thanks Chris! That's a great looking book. I think I'll order one before my upcoming 18+ hour, three flight trek to St. Petersburg!

ceyman

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Taking Phtos through windows
« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2007, 08:06:37 PM »

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I believe the use of a polarizing filter will help to minimize reflections by excluding off-axis light waves.
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Actually, polarizing filters do not play well with airplane windows.  The plastic in the airliner window polarizes the light already, so when you add the polarizing filter you usually create problems.  

Quote
This book will both inspire you and provide you with many answers:
[a href=\"http://www.amazon.com/Window-Seat-Photogra...83460857&sr=8-2]http://www.amazon.com/Window-Seat-Photogra...83460857&sr=8-2[/url]
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=126016\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

This is indeed a great book.  After I read it I had my camera out so much on airline flights that I think I'm probably on some FBI terror watch list somewhere.

carl
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