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Author Topic: Optimum print resolution  (Read 9426 times)

PSA DC-9-30

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Optimum print resolution
« on: June 29, 2007, 01:32:40 AM »

I've always heard that 300 dpi is the optimum print resolution. However, images from my 6 MP camera are not large enough for even an 8x10 at 300 dpi, much less something like an 11x17. Recently however, I read a post on this site saying that print resolution should usually be between 240 and 300 dpi. Is 240 going to be distinguishable from 300 in most cases? What is the lowest resolution you would try to get away with?

Also, why is "ppi" used increasingly instead of "dpi"?

Thanks,
Kevin
« Last Edit: June 29, 2007, 02:08:35 AM by PSA DC-9-30 »
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Richowens

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Optimum print resolution
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2007, 02:36:29 AM »

Hi Kevin,

 I send everything to the printer at 240 PPI (pixels per inch). I find no difference between that and 300 or even 360 PPI. If you are outsourcing your prints their printer may require 300 PPI, in which case you can use Jack Flesher's method to upres your print to the desired size. Be aware that you probably can't go beyond about a 10x15, with 6 megapixels, unless the photo is exceptionally sharp. Knowing how far you can go comes with experience.

http://www.outbackphoto.com/workflow/wf_60/essay.html

 On the Epson 2200 I print at 1440 DPI (dots per inch).

 DPI is a printer term, PPI is a photo size term. Quite often they are used interchangibly, but most people understand what the person is referring to.

 Have fun in St. Petersburg.

 Rich

PSA DC-9-30

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Optimum print resolution
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2007, 03:23:47 AM »

Quote
Hi Kevin,

 I send everything to the printer at 240 PPI (pixels per inch). I find no difference between that and 300 or even 360 PPI. If you are outsourcing your prints their printer may require 300 PPI, in which case you can use Jack Flesher's method to upres your print to the desired size. Be aware that you probably can't go beyond about a 10x15, with 6 megapixels, unless the photo is exceptionally sharp. Knowing how far you can go comes with experience.

http://www.outbackphoto.com/workflow/wf_60/essay.html

 On the Epson 2200 I print at 1440 DPI (dots per inch).

 DPI is a printer term, PPI is a photo size term. Quite often they are used interchangibly, but most people understand what the person is referring to.

 Have fun in St. Petersburg.

 Rich
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Thanks Rich, two weeks in St. Petersburg should yield at least a couple thousand photos!

Anyway, I'm trying to start a portfolio consisting of 8x10 (or thereabouts) prints of my best photos--both from digital and (scanned) 35 mm slides. The aspect ratio I'm using  on the SP-500 is 3:4, so I have the choice of either cropping and losing some of the photo, or doing something like 7 x 9.333 (at a true 300 dpi) with a border. I'm not all that happy with either option really.

PSA DC-9-30

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Optimum print resolution
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2007, 03:38:57 AM »

OK, I have an image all set up to go at 8x10 with a resolution of 264 dpi. I am taking it to a photofinishing lab where it will be printed using traditional photographic paper and chemicals.

Do you think I'd be better off leaving it at 264 dpi, or upsampling to 300 dpi using a bicubic smoother resampling in CS2?
« Last Edit: June 29, 2007, 03:46:34 AM by PSA DC-9-30 »
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PSA DC-9-30

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Optimum print resolution
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2007, 03:44:43 AM »

Quote
OK, I have an image all set up to go at 8x10 with a resolution of 264 dpi. I am taking it to a photofinishing lab where it will be printed using traditional photographic paper and chemicals.

Do you think I'd be better off leaving it at 264 dpi, or upsampling to 300 dpi using a bicubic smoother resampling (as described in the article) in CS2?
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Sorry, double post. Mod's please delete!
« Last Edit: June 29, 2007, 03:45:57 AM by PSA DC-9-30 »
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James Godman

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Optimum print resolution
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2007, 11:19:41 AM »

It could be cool if you printed the images the size you are planning, but on 11x14 paper.  The extra space around your images will look nice.

Richowens

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Optimum print resolution
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2007, 11:44:27 AM »

Kevin,
 
 At this point I would call the lab and ask them what their preferred resoution (PPI) is for their machine. Most likely it will be 300PPI since a lightjet prints at 300DPI.

 Rich

ed j

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Optimum print resolution
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2007, 12:44:01 PM »

u have 2 sets of dpi to work with, the image dpi and the printers dpi

all image dpi can be saved as 125 dpi the print dpi should be 720 or higher

for small prints 11 x 17 or smaller i use image dpi and print dpi of the max my printer will go.

large prints 2' x 6' by 300 dpi image can be a 70 meg file printing that image at 1400 dpi can make it over a gig in  size. could take over 1/2 hr or more before it compiled, spooled and ready to print. exporting that 2 x 6 as a 125 dpi image and printing at 720 to 1400 dpi it will start to print almost instanly  and the quality is just as good  ad the original 2x6x300 dpi image.

just rember a $ saved is not always a $ saved it could be a lost customer

Ed


Quote
I've always heard that 300 dpi is the optimum print resolution. However, images from my 6 MP camera are not large enough for even an 8x10 at 300 dpi, much less something like an 11x17. Recently however, I read a post on this site saying that print resolution should usually be between 240 and 300 dpi. Is 240 going to be distinguishable from 300 in most cases? What is the lowest resolution you would try to get away with?

Also, why is "ppi" used increasingly instead of "dpi"?

Thanks,
Kevin
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Richowens

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Optimum print resolution
« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2007, 02:16:15 PM »

Me again Kevin,

 Here is an article by Michael which will answer many of your questions better than I can.

http://luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/un...esolution.shtml

 Rich
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