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Author Topic: Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?  (Read 19134 times)

shanephelps

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Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?
« on: May 11, 2007, 12:25:46 PM »

I will be climbing Mt. Rainier in June and wil be bringing along my Canon 20D and 18-85 IS lens.  I need to bring along a tripod also, but my Manfrotto/Bogen tripod and ball head are way too heavy.  So, I'd like to buy a new lightweight tripod for the trip.  Obviously, I could go with the very expensive carbon fiber tripods, but I really don't want to spend more than a couple of hundred dollars.  I would be grateful for any suggestions.  I hope to be taking landscape shots as well as candids of our adventure and I will need to have a tripod.  The trip will require me to carry about 40 pounds before I add the weight for the camera equipment, so every ounce counts.  Thanks in advance.  Shane.
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Sheldon N

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Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2007, 09:17:45 PM »

One of the smaller Feisol tripods would be perfect for your needs and budget. Check them out at www.feisol.com.

Goodlistener

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Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2007, 08:10:32 AM »

Had you considered just resting the camera on a balled up jacket or sleeping bag?
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stever

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Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2007, 10:50:10 AM »

i use a velbon ultra max for travel - it is light and flimsy and inexpensive, but works fine with cable release or self-timer, and of course it's best to hang some weight on it and not use the last leg extension unless you have to

the ball head it comes with isn't much good and i use a RRS 25 or 40 depending on use and how much weight i want to carry
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Lisa Nikodym

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Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2007, 11:13:31 AM »

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i use a velbon ultra max for travel - it is light and flimsy and inexpensive

I started out with a light Velbon too, but found it unusable on even moderately breezy days because the wind would make it vibrate unacceptably.  If you expect there to be any wind, even a moderate breeze, I wouldn't count on one.  (I got rid of mine and replaced it with a smallish carbon-fiber Gitzo, which has performed admirably.  Not as light, but light enough, and is actually usable!)

Lisa

trigeek

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Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2007, 01:21:56 PM »

I'll second the suggestion to look at Feisol. I purchased one recently and am very happy  with the quality. Pretty light too, good for backpacking.
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ceyman

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Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2007, 12:51:55 PM »

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I'll second the suggestion to look at Feisol. I purchased one recently and am very happy  with the quality. Pretty light too, good for backpacking.
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

[a href=\"http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=14694&st=0&p=101392&#entry101392] Here's[/url] a link to my comments on another tripod thread several months ago.  I've had no reason to regret my purchase.  

carl
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dchew

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Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2007, 08:40:56 AM »

This will sound strange coming from someone who uses a tripod religiously, but you might consider not taking one for the actual climb.  I don't know what route you're taking; I did the Emmons Glacier last year, and decided to leave my Gitzo 1228 CF behind at the last minute.  There are plenty of rocks at Camp Shurman and at the summit for support, and during the climb it is terribly inconvenient for your entire party to stop and wait for you to set up a tripod (rope management is quite important for glacier travel, so if one person stops everyone does).

You could always leave the tripod at Shurman or wherever your staged camp is, but I honestly found plenty of ways to improvise support.  I had a 5D w/ 35mm f/2 and 70-200 f/4.

Good luck and have a blast!

Dave
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usathyan

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Best backpacking (inexpensive) tripod?
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2007, 10:47:02 AM »

Quote
I will be climbing Mt. Rainier in June and wil be bringing along my Canon 20D and 18-85 IS lens.  I need to bring along a tripod also, but my Manfrotto/Bogen tripod and ball head are way too heavy.  So, I'd like to buy a new lightweight tripod for the trip.  Obviously, I could go with the very expensive carbon fiber tripods, but I really don't want to spend more than a couple of hundred dollars.  I would be grateful for any suggestions.  I hope to be taking landscape shots as well as candids of our adventure and I will need to have a tripod.  The trip will require me to carry about 40 pounds before I add the weight for the camera equipment, so every ounce counts.  Thanks in advance.  Shane.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=116987\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]



Have you looked at Induro C014? If you use this with a Markins Q3 or the small RRH ballhead - its a perfect light weight tripod setup. The total should weight less than any other combination i have seen...unless of course its a Gitzo Traveller tripod...which is the ultimate. You can get the legs at B&H & ballhead at www.prophotoshop.com (aka nikonians.org) and/or www.reallyrightstuff.com.
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