Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?  (Read 5248 times)

willconnor

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 44
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« on: January 07, 2007, 11:21:42 AM »

I am making handmade books of my photography, and  have  been using my Epson 7800, but there two major problems.  It can only take one sheet of paper at a time and it leaves scuff tracks on the back of fine art paper.  (I'm using both sides of the paper.)

 Does anyone know of a printer that would meet the following criteria?
 
--at least 13" wide

--uses pigment inks

--a paper-feed cartridge that will handle multiple sheets of fine art paper (I don't want to feed one a time)

--a straight path for the paper  (in one side and out the other)

--will not scuff the back side of fine art paper.

Thanks for any suggestions!
Logged

AlanS

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 19
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2007, 01:38:27 PM »

While i do do know of a printer to suggest that meets your needs. However, when you back up the sheet for the second pass you might try to tape a thin sheet to the feed edge to protect the back. You should find a low tack tape that will release without issues

Personally I feel the book would have more value if the images were only printed one side
Logged

Brian Gilkes

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 443
    • http://www.briangilkes.com.au
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2007, 03:37:04 PM »

Quote from: willconnor,Jan 7 2007, 04:21 PM
I am making handmade books of my photography, and  have  been using my Epson 7800, but there two major problems.  It can only take one sheet of paper at a time and it leaves scuff tracks on the back of fine art paper.  (I'm using both sides of the paper.)

Will,
What paper  are you using?
Cheers,
Brian
www.pharoseditions
Logged

Ed Foster, Jr.

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 219
    • http://www.edfoster.net
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2007, 03:57:04 PM »

Quote
I am making handmade books of my photography, and  have  been using my Epson 7800, but there two major problems.  It can only take one sheet of paper at a time and it leaves scuff tracks on the back of fine art paper.  (I'm using both sides of the paper.) <snip>
Thanks for any suggestions!  [a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94319\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Will,

I only have one positive answer for you regarding the scuff marks, because it is what works successfully for me on the 7800.  Just align a blank sheet of thin paper (I use RedRiver Premium Matte 32# bacause it is handy) against the printed side and insert them together when feeding.  I have yet to have a problem this way.
 
I don't know for sure because I have not used one, but I understand the Epson 4800 has sheet feed capabilities, however, you will have, most likely, the same problem with the finished side as it goes through the second time.

Personally, I too, wish there were a better solution as it is a pain feeding each sheet.

FOR BRIAN FYI: While not a "fine art" paper by definition, I do prefer a semi-gloss for some images.  It is near impossible to find in a 2 sided sheet, however, one that I have used for a couple of years that does an outstanding job is Moab's Kokopelli Semi-Gloss Studio 285 gsm.

Good Luck,
Ed
Logged
Ed Foster, Jr.
www.edfoster.net

willconnor

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 44
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2007, 07:23:26 PM »

Quote from: Brian Gilkes,Jan 7 2007, 08:37 PM
Quote from: willconnor,Jan 7 2007, 04:21 PM
I am making handmade books of my photography, and  have  been using my Epson 7800, but there two major problems.  It can only take one sheet of paper at a time and it leaves scuff tracks on the back of fine art paper.  (I'm using both sides of the paper.)

Will,
What paper  are you using?
Cheers,
Brian
www.pharoseditions
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94381\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
 
Brian,
I've used Moab Entrada mostly.  Also, I've tried Museo II double sided, Innova Photo Smooth Cotton Duo, and Innova Soft Textured Duo all with good results.  But the Epson scuffs all of them.

Will
Logged

Greg_E

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 113
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2007, 10:52:46 PM »

Not that this helps any, but my Epson 9500 generally doesn't scuff the printed side on the second pass. So you might want to look into getting your 7x00 fixed.
Logged

Brian Gilkes

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 443
    • http://www.briangilkes.com.au
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2007, 06:41:11 AM »

Quote from:
Brian,
I've used Moab Entrada mostly.  Also, I've tried Museo II double sided, Innova Photo Smooth Cotton Duo, and Innova Soft Textured Duo all with good results.  But the Epson scuffs all of them.

Will

I must try the Moab. There have been a few good reports. I have Museo II (OK ) , Stirling 250, Lanajet with occasional scuffing. The backing sheet is  a pain but a working option.
Another possibility would be to spray the first printed side with Premier Art Print Shield or similar.
Schutt Dutch Etching paper is OK for text and background images, but it is uncoated , DMax around 1.2, so I tip images on Silver Rag etc in.
Cheers,
Brian
[url=http://www.pharoseditions.com.au
www.pharoseditions.com.au[/url]
Logged

Jae_Moon

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 133
    • http://
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2007, 11:27:08 AM »

Quote
Personally I feel the book would have more value if the images were only printed one side
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94345\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


When you make a book in traditional ways, as I do, you need to make pages into folios (folded in half) and print them in both sides even if each page does not have images in both sides. I hope it makes sense, try to fold a sheet in half, you will see what I mean.

Jae Moon
Logged

AlanS

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 19
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2007, 12:12:32 PM »

Quote
When you make a book in traditional ways, as I do, you need to make pages into folios (folded in half) and print them in both sides even if each page does not have images in both sides. I hope it makes sense, try to fold a sheet in half, you will see what I mean.

Jae Moon

I does make sense and you are producing a book that has images on 1 side of the page; there are still many ways to bind a book that do not require putting the printed page thru the printer 2 times... side sewing, grommetting, chicago screws, perfectbinding and so on.
Logged

picnic

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 574
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2007, 01:11:52 PM »

Quote
I does make sense and you are producing a book that has images on 1 side of the page; there are still many ways to bind a book that do not require putting the printed page thru the printer 2 times... side sewing, grommetting, chicago screws, perfectbinding and so on.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94551\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

A bit OT---but this thread interests me.  I've done a few books, but am interested in handbound only--and am going to take a several meeting handbinding workshop so that I can better learn my options.  I print on only one side and will continue to so need to learn those techniques that work best with this.

Diane
Logged

Jae_Moon

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 133
    • http://
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2007, 02:44:43 PM »

Quote
I does make sense and you are producing a book that has images on 1 side of the page; there are still many ways to bind a book that do not require putting the printed page thru the printer 2 times... side sewing, grommetting, chicago screws, perfectbinding and so on.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94551\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

As I indicated, I make photo albums in 'traditional' way. When I started doing this, I wanted to make my books which will meet the following criteria:

1. Book should open flat and stay open flat. Side sewing or perfect binding will not do that.
2. The original prints should be protected. No holes or side sewing
3. Should handle heavy stock paper.

I've been taking several bookbinding workshops and so far I know three different methods that meet my requirements; 1) wire edge binding, 2) drum leaf binding, and 3) a variation of case binding.

Send me a PM if anyone are interested in the topic.

Jae Moon
Logged

Chris_T

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 541
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2007, 08:05:12 AM »

Would like to hear from the bookmakers how they make their books. By kits and which? From scratch? Any one tried RedRiver's kit? Thanks.
Logged

fvkellogg

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2007, 06:46:36 PM »

Quote
I am making handmade books of my photography, and  have  been using my Epson 7800, but there two major problems.  It can only take one sheet of paper at a time and it leaves scuff tracks on the back of fine art paper.  (I'm using both sides of the paper.)

 Does anyone know of a printer that would meet the following criteria?
 
--at least 13" wide

--uses pigment inks

--a paper-feed cartridge that will handle multiple sheets of fine art paper (I don't want to feed one a time)

--a straight path for the paper  (in one side and out the other)

--will not scuff the back side of fine art paper.

Thanks for any suggestions!
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94319\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Logged

fvkellogg

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Ideal Printer for Bookmaking?
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2007, 07:06:23 PM »

I've had fairly good luck printing small books on an Epson 1280. I use Media Street pigment ink and print 2 sides which are then folded into signatures for binding. Scuffing is not problem as long as I allow the first side to dry for an hour or two before printing the second side.

I don't print on fine art paper, but use 2-sided matte available from Red River and other suppliers. The real problem is finding cross grain stock so that when folded the grain runs parallel to the book's spine.  Recognition Systems (516) 625-5000 is a paper converter that can can provide a range of grain specific cut sheets in 500 sheet orders.

Fred
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up