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Author Topic: Custom Camera Machining/Fabrication?  (Read 272 times)

acapela

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Custom Camera Machining/Fabrication?
« on: July 12, 2018, 07:39:13 AM »

I am in the USA (Denver, CO area).

I have Schneider 120mm and 150mm lenses in shutters (including several variants of 150mm lens), along with the associated Schneider helical focusing mounts (for the 120mm and at least one of the 150mm variants).

I am interested in having one lens of each focal length "mounted" for use on a Horseman 617 camera.

Can anyone recommend a "machinist" who would be able to measure/design/fabricate/finish the necessary components (anodized/powder-coated lens cones, for the Horseman 617, dimensioned to focus accurately at infinity; possibly a custom helical focusing mount for a 150mm in #1 shutter, with DOF scale; etc)? I can supply the lenses, helical mounts, and sample Horseman 617 equipment.

Historically, I have always gone to SKGrimes, for pretty much anything/everything (they have a couple of jobs for me in progress currently), but it looks like SKGrimes is under a lot of pressure at the moment, lead times for even simple things are on the magnitude of several months and they currently aren't responding to my attempts to communicate (in short, they seem to be REALLY busy).

I am interested in reliable/capable alternatives who are still actively in business... if any.

Thanks in advance for any help.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 07:51:09 AM by acapela »
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NancyP

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Re: Custom Camera Machining/Fabrication?
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2018, 11:47:57 AM »

I don't know if he does this sort of thing (exotic custom work on uncommon cameras), but Peter Hejnar in suburban Chicago has designed and custom-milled mounting components for contemporary cameras, partly as a trial to see if he wants to market the item later. Rails, pano stuff, macro, etc
hejnarphoto.com
He is best known for the inventor and only source for a "convert your Manfrotto 410/405 geared head from Manfrotto clamp (ugh) to Arca-Swiss clamp" kit. I have recommended this kit a zillion times to people who want a relatively inexpensive geared head.
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acapela

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Re: Custom Camera Machining/Fabrication?
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2018, 01:25:22 PM »

I don't know if he does this sort of thing (exotic custom work on uncommon cameras), but Peter Hejnar in suburban Chicago has designed and custom-milled mounting components for contemporary cameras, partly as a trial to see if he wants to market the item later. Rails, pano stuff, macro, etc
hejnarphoto.com
He is best known for the inventor and only source for a "convert your Manfrotto 410/405 geared head from Manfrotto clamp (ugh) to Arca-Swiss clamp" kit. I have recommended this kit a zillion times to people who want a relatively inexpensive geared head.

Thanks for the info. I will get in touch with him to determine his interest when I get closer to proceeding.

FYI, the web link appears to have changed to: http://www.hejnarphotostore.com/default.asp.

His Manfrotto 405 solution is functionally identical to what I have always used: standard Manfrotto 410PL plate (for the 405/410 heads) plus an Arca-Swiss 802010 Flip-Lock Quick-Set, mounted conventionally to the Manfrotto plate. His solution would probably be more stable, in absolute terms, and you could use an 802010 with his plates. I do something similar for my Manfrotto 400 heads.
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NancyP

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Re: Custom Camera Machining/Fabrication?
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2018, 02:16:37 PM »

If you use the 405/410 frequently, you should get the replacement kit (with or without clamp) if there is any play in your current solution. I bought my 410 used, OEM clamp had play that drove me nuts, this fixed things. You unscrew the Manfrotto clamp and remove parts, install the Hejnar clamp base with his A-S clamp or your existing A-S clamp. This should be rock-steady now. His clamps are the old-fashioned screw clamps, which I prefer to the lever clamps. I am no great shakes in the DIY department, and this was simple. The hardest part was getting the screw out of the ancient Manfrotto 410, not perma-glued in but it did require heating head in oven, then cooling, before the screw would budge with an old-fashioned manual screwdriver and my flabby arm.
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