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Author Topic: Feeding panorama sheets  (Read 353 times)

snowy

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Feeding panorama sheets
« on: June 30, 2018, 09:01:19 PM »

Hi, any suggestions for feeding the following sheets, Epson P800:

Red River 75lb Arctic Polar Luster 13x38 inches, pano sheets
11.8 mil, 290 gms

FFA,
Regular top feeder,
Insert as roll from back.

I assume that the printer would recognize a Custom Size of 13x38.

Mac 10.11

Thanks much

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Mark D Segal

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Re: Feeding panorama sheets
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2018, 09:13:15 PM »

You should make a custom size preset for this paper and see whether the printer recognizes it. It should if you did it correctly and saved it. Epson has instructions on this in the manual.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....."

BradSmith

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Re: Feeding panorama sheets
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2018, 12:53:35 PM »

As far as loading is concerned, I'd probably load from the rear slot (Mark Segal's suggested way of loading fine art papers).  But I have loaded paper of this thickness from the top sheet feeder before.
Brad
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Cincinnati

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Re: Feeding panorama sheets
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2018, 10:01:01 AM »

I placed a 16x25 sheet of matboard into the top print loading area. My printer is backed near a wall. I adjusted the printer so the top edge  of the matboard rested against the wall. The 17x33 paper was supported by this matboard and fed very smoothly into my 3880.
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Paul Roark

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Re: Feeding panorama sheets
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2018, 04:41:14 PM »

I've used those 13x(very long) sheets from Red River without much of a problem.   I fed them from the top/regular paper feed slot.  I made a long exit tray out of cardboard (taped to the regular tray) and had the printer such that the extended exit tray was on top of a bookshelf at the appropriate height.  The printer backed up to a wall.  I'd help guide the paper to be sure it started OK.  Once started, the paper could be curled into a roll on top of the printer.  I'd just check it occasionally to be sure the roll was stable and paper feeding correctly.  Once the print is far enough along that the remainder of the paper could hold itself up against the wall, I unrolled the paper from the top of the printer and laid it against the wall.  It works.

Paul
www.PaulRoark.com
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