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Author Topic: New Article - Seeing Wildlife As Compositional Elements  (Read 722 times)

Chris Sanderson

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New Article - Seeing Wildlife As Compositional Elements
« on: June 23, 2018, 11:08:51 AM »

New Article Today - Seeing Wildlife As Compositional Elements by Harvey Stearn
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Christopher Sanderson
The Luminous-Landscape

Mark D Segal

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Re: New Article - Seeing Wildlife As Compositional Elements
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2018, 11:14:04 AM »

Great article, Chris. Thanks for publishing. These are really difficult kind of photographs to make - needs unusual patience and visualization skills, so all the more appreciated.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
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Rory

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Re: New Article - Seeing Wildlife As Compositional Elements
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2018, 11:02:36 PM »

Thanks for the article Harvey.  I enjoyed your mountain goat and mountain sheep shots and the "odd man out" penguin and ibis shots.   
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deliberate1

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Re: New Article - Seeing Wildlife As Compositional Elements
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2018, 10:17:06 PM »

Harvey, a good read. I never gave much thought to shooting critters (with a camera, of course) until I wandered into a horse barn at a local agricultural fair here in Maine several years ago. The filtered light was magic as it reflected off the horses' coats. Since that time, I have spent many more days in the company of horses which have become my favorite subjects. Especially in the quiet of the barn or pasture. Your comment that images of single animals sell better than groups is good news to me. I tend to shoot single horses or two interacting. It has been a revelation to see how they communicate and relate to one another. The more time I spend with them, the more I understand them and the better my images. I get the allure of "horse porn" - herds of horses galloping off into the sunset, and the like. But for me, the magic comes in those moments of calm. With regards to composition, the intersection of horse bodies can create an elegant canvas. And getting even closer, isolated anatomical components, when luck strikes can create wonderful abstractions that are truly greater than the whole. Again, thanks for the article.
Best,
David
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