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Author Topic: Uprezing advice and available uprez programs  (Read 353 times)

ymc226

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Uprezing advice and available uprez programs
« on: May 10, 2018, 07:50:35 PM »

I am getting results that I am very happy with from Whitewall acrylic faced prints in large sizes up to 40 x 55 inches using either files from the 18MP Leica Monochrome 1 or 24MP Leica M240.   I didn't crop much, if at all, so most of the original file was used.  I post process in LR6, sharpening and applying noise reduction as well as "soft previewing" what the image would look like in the actual size using Photoshop 6 according to the directions provided by Bumblejax.  I also imported the ICC profiles from Whitewall to see the apparent result would be like on my NEC Spectraview monitors.   I want to print larger, maybe 50 x 70 inches but don't want to stitch files together or upgrade to digital medium format.   

Would modifying a file by uprezing improve my results and if so, what uprezing programs would you recommend.  I don't want to use Photoshop even though I have PS6 as I remember reading various posts (I should have saved those) that recommended other programs.  Seeing the Whitewall HD acrylic HD prints at their SOHO gallery, I have the perfect picture in mind for my next order if only I could increase the file size.
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NAwlins_Contrarian

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Re: Uprezing advice and available uprez programs
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2018, 12:43:57 AM »

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I am very happy with ... acrylic faced prints in large sizes up to 40 x 55 inches .... I want to print larger, maybe 50 x 70 inches ....

I have to believe that if you are "very happy" with 40x55 inch prints, you would be at least reasonably happy with 50x70 inch prints produced from the same files. That is only a 27% increase in the linear dimension.

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Would modifying a file by uprezing improve my results ....

Lots of people upscale / upsample images--you cannot truly increase their resolution with real image detail--before uploading to printing services, but both my personal experience and my gut instinct based on the technology and processes involved make me strongly supect that very few of those people get results substantially better than the lab would have gotten if it had done the upscaling / upsampling.

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and if so, what uprezing programs would you recommend.

I think Lightroom's print module does a quite nice job. If you want to try something else that many people like and that isn't expensive, there's Qimage. Another not-too-expensive piece of software that has been recommended (and has some nice-looking demos) is PhotoZoom (http://www.benvista.com/products).
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Joe Towner

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Re: Uprezing advice and available uprez programs
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2018, 02:13:39 PM »

Why do you not want to stitch an image?  It's the only way you can make a larger photo with the gear you have, with real details.  Up-resolving an image doesn't add detail, it takes the existing detail and spreads it over a larger area, so when you get close to an image, you'll see the difference.  Lightroom & Photoshop make quick work, especially for a 4-6 shot stitch.  Overlap the framing 50% and shoot wider and taller than the final image.  Feed the images into LR/PS and you're quickly at the resolution you need.

With that said, there are things that can't be stitched since each photo is taken at a different time, and you really want each subject completely in one frame. There are ways around this with masking & more photos being a part of the stitch, but that's another topic.
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Rand47

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Re: Uprezing advice and available uprez programs
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2018, 02:29:12 PM »

When preparing images for very large prints, I try not to let the native resolution at "print size" drop below 180 ppi.   When it does, I'll make a copy of the file and then upsample in Photoshop using "Preserve Details" in the Image Size dialog.  I'll then test print samples from LR using LR's on-the-fly print module resolution (360 in my case on an Epson).  Most often the upsampled image will be a little better.  I find that it is most often image dependent in terms of potential for upsampling artifacts.

Rand
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Rand Scott Adams
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