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Author Topic: Need help determining max print width on Epson 24" printers with 24.8" wide roll  (Read 712 times)

Dan Berg

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Sounds simple, not so fast..
I am planning on purchasing the Epson P6000 for conversion to dye sublimation.
The largest metals we want to do are 24x36" requiring a transfer paper printed width of 24.4" for 24" wide metal.
We can get the 24.8 wide transfer paper rolls that are manufactured for the Sawgrass Virtuoso VJ-628.
That printer will print the 24.4 width required for proper bleed for 24" wide Chromaluxe metals.
No I am not buying that printer as it is $7,000 with ink, rip printer and stand. The real killer is that it uses Sawgrass ink, NO way.
Not quite sure what they are thinking with that price point?
The Epson P6000 is $2,195 + $920 for ink = $3115 and no rip required.

The question. Can anyone tell me if I can force the 24" Epson to print anything wider then 24"?
If anyone with a 24" Epson can tell me if they have ever put any paper that width through their printer and if so what are the results.
My only option if it is stuck at exactly 24" is go to the 44" P8000. Only a thousand more but hate to do that for sake of a lousy .40"

« Last Edit: April 05, 2018, 12:49:11 PM by Dan Berg »
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I.T. Supplies

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The P6000 24" printer can't go wider than 24" and putting Dye-sub ink in the aqueous versions will void the warranty and potentially blow the head since this head isn't made for that process.

You're better off with a Dye-sub printer that is designed for this process and the inks should be less expensive that way.  If you buy the Epson Dye-sub printer, it will come with Epson Dye-sub ink (not Sawgrass).  They only make dye-sub converted ink for Epson's previous generations and smaller printers.

If you get a P series printer, you would mainly be able to print anything from coated paper up to posterboard that has an inkjet coating.  You may find some 3rd party dye-sub company out there that has inks for the P series models, but it's highly not recommended on this version unless you want attempt it and if something happens to the head, you will have to pay to fix it yourself.  It may be better to talk to a company that sells the printer about this process and see what would be better suggested for your printing needs.
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Dan Berg

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Sorry to differ but the J-Teck ink can be used in just about any Epson.
All of the Epson dye sub printers are all 4 channel CMYK and not the best for my clients photos.
I need the 8 color inkset for the best color and the included Lk and LLK for good B&W metal prints.
The specific inks I get from J-Teck are specifically designed for the TFP printhead.
J-Teck has been selling ink for a long time for Epson printers. (They have a wide format agreement for a number of years with Sawgrass the Patent holder.
Even Epson had to sign off with Sawgrass for quite a few million so they could sell wide format dye sub ink. (Pretty much all of the dye sub inks are Sawgrasses patented formula)
The Epson wide format printers from 7700, 9700, 7890, 9890, 7900, 9900 and now the new models all run great with the J-Teck inset. (Sawgrass insets as well)
Most everyone in our business runs dye sub printers with a Wasatch Rip.
Because this inset has the exact same colors as the Epson colors you do not have to setup a custom inset.
I have the i1 Photo Pro and just plan to do a good profile and done.
I know you are in the business but so am I.

Warranty, now that's another issue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUUc9vbC4Fw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rOdFZMutKA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2iSDGPszh0
« Last Edit: April 06, 2018, 03:02:26 PM by Dan Berg »
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Dan Berg

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Looks like I have answered my own question.
I cut a piece of cheap matte paper to a width of 44.5 and inserted in into my 9900.
The printer took it ok. I then tried to print to 44.4, no luck. Trying all the different settings, still would not print.
I then changed the paper width to 44.25 and now it worked. The max printed width was 44 3/32" which is not good enough.
If this works the exact same way on a 24" printer and prints a width of 24 3/32" that is not enough bleed for a 24" wide metal panel.
My other option is to purchase the 24x36" panels and have my friend CNC them to 23 13/16"
Not sure if the Chromaluxe people will custom cut sizes, probably worth the call.
I could try cutting a 3/16" sliver off each panel with my aluminum blade and sliding table saw. They are just so easy to chip the edges.
A CNC is the right way to do this.
These panels are in the range of $78 each so you do not want to ruin too many if you can help it.
Might be easier to spend the extra thousand and just get the larger printer then fool with all this nonsense.

Wayne Fox

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Looks like I have answered my own question.
 ...

Might be easier to spend the extra thousand and just get the larger printer then fool with all this nonsense.
think thatís your answer.  Who knows, in a year or two you might decide to buy a larger press so  you can do 40x60 panels.
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Ernst Dinkla

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Looks like I have answered my own question.
I cut a piece of cheap matte paper to a width of 44.5 and inserted in into my 9900.
The printer took it ok. I then tried to print to 44.4, no luck. Trying all the different settings, still would not print.
I then changed the paper width to 44.25 and now it worked. The max printed width was 44 3/32" which is not good enough.
If this works the exact same way on a 24" printer and prints a width of 24 3/32" that is not enough bleed for a 24" wide metal panel.
My other option is to purchase the 24x36" panels and have my friend CNC them to 23 13/16"
Not sure if the Chromaluxe people will custom cut sizes, probably worth the call.
I could try cutting a 3/16" sliver off each panel with my aluminum blade and sliding table saw. They are just so easy to chip the edges.
A CNC is the right way to do this.
These panels are in the range of $78 each so you do not want to ruin too many if you can help it.
Might be easier to spend the extra thousand and just get the larger printer then fool with all this nonsense.

Dan,
 
Is the aluminium that hard you can not cut it with a board cutter?  The blade type, not the rotary. Cut the not covered / non aligned edges after the sublimation process. I do that with cold mounted prints on 2mm DiBond but it is possible too with aluminium sheets up to 2mm thick as long as the part to cut off is small enough to take all the energy of the cut, in other words spiral off the cutting blade. The sheet remains flat then. Not too small either that the blade wanders off to the edge.  Roughly between 5 and 7mm.

My media supplier started a sublimation print service here as many print shops avoid the investment . Some samples he had with him had rounded corners as well. I think done after the process.

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

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March 2017 update, 750+ inkjet media white spectral plots
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Dan Berg

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It is the fragility of the coating that is the issue.
Accucutter has a 25" shear that I am told works very well but I need it trimmed the long dimension so that will not work.
I purchased Accucutter's corner radius cutter so that part I have covered.
I have tried real small cuts on my table saw with mixed results.
It must be held down firmly or it will undoubtably chip. Too much work especially with the risk of chipping.
Plus it leaves a rough edge that has to be filed and then corners rounded.
Looks like a P8000.

Ernst Dinkla

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It is the fragility of the coating that is the issue.
Accucutter has a 25" shear that I am told works very well but I need it trimmed the long dimension so that will not work.
I purchased Accucutter's corner radius cutter so that part I have covered.
I have tried real small cuts on my table saw with mixed results.
It must be held down firmly or it will undoubtably chip. Too much work especially with the risk of chipping.
Plus it leaves a rough edge that has to be filed and then corners rounded.
Looks like a P8000.

I get the picture. And a lasercutter will create other issues.

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
March 2017 update, 750+ inkjet media white spectral plots
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Dan Berg

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think thatís your answer.  Who knows, in a year or two you might decide to buy a larger press so  you can do 40x60 panels.

Actually found a used Knight 40x60 in Ohio for $8k which is half what a new one cost.
Problem is the spending is not over there. $1k to truck it here and another $500 to have my local equipment guy truck a tow motor here just to unload it and get it in the shop.
Weights 3000 lbs. way too heavy for a lift gate.

Dan Berg

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I get the picture. And a lasercutter will create other issues.

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
March 2017 update, 750+ inkjet media white spectral plots

CNC is the way to go. Buy full sheets and custom cut everything to size.
Like you mentioned, quite a few guys over here with small dye sub operations that do not want to invest in all this equipment.
Could probably make a business out of cutting and pressing custom larger sizes for other shops.
Oh me oh my will it ever end..
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