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Author Topic: Windows crash  (Read 968 times)

Jonathan Cross

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Windows crash
« on: March 30, 2018, 06:59:15 AM »

Have had a major windows 10 crash that meant my PC would not boot at all.  Microsoft tried to solve the problem in a 2 hour phone call from them, but they ended up resetting my PC and installing Windows 10.  My data (which is backed up anyway) seems OK, but Lightroom 6 has vanished.  Is there anyway of getting it back?  I still have the product key from when I downloaded Windows 6.

Does the same ever happen with Macs?

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Jonathan in UK

Jonathan Cross

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2018, 07:20:46 AM »

Oops - the penultimate sentence in my e-mail above should have said I still have the product code from when I downloaded Lightroom 6.
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Jonathan in UK

mcbroomf

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2018, 08:11:46 AM »

Yes, you just download it again and register it with your code.
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Jonathan Cross

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2018, 10:34:29 AM »

Yes, thanks, but easier said than done.  The reset had lost Adobe Application manager, so that was a false start and finding Lightroom in my orders was not as easy as it could be.  However have now got it back having found the code for LR5 from which I had upgraded, and have now updated to 6.14, so happy again, just annoyed about all the time it is taking!

It is enough to make me think of a Mac, but do Macs crash so that one has go through this? 
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Jonathan in UK
Re: Windows crash
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2018, 11:58:46 AM »

yes.
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Joe Towner

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2018, 01:45:36 PM »

It is enough to make me think of a Mac, but do Macs crash so that one has go through this?

No, they don't crash like this.  With Time Machine, you can do a continuous backup and worst case do a full restore to multiple points in time with minimal to no hassle.  Mac also doesn't force updates on you like Windows 10.

If you want to try an interim step, grab an external drive and a copy of something like TrueImage Home where you can do constant backups, with checkpoints that just work.  Need to restore - boot off a cd/usb, point it at the drive and hit restore.
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degrub

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2018, 01:53:57 PM »

crash and recover are the same if you have a good backup. What Joe suggests or using rsync will work. rsync requires a little more work initially.
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Dave Rosser

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2018, 02:53:03 PM »

No, they don't crash like this.  With Time Machine, you can do a continuous backup and worst case do a full restore to multiple points in time with minimal to no hassle.  Mac also doesn't force updates on you like Windows 10.

If you want to try an interim step, grab an external drive and a copy of something like TrueImage Home where you can do constant backups, with checkpoints that just work.  Need to restore - boot off a cd/usb, point it at the drive and hit restore.
What's the difference between File History on Windows 10 and Time Machine? As far as I can see they both do much the same thing.
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Farmer

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2018, 05:37:27 PM »

If you run any sort of backup (and time machine style is just as easy to do under Windows), then both are the same following a catastrophic crash or rebuild (software or hardware).

I'm sorry, but the notion that Apple and Windows are any different in this regard is complete nonsense.
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Phil Brown

Joe Towner

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2018, 10:44:47 PM »

What's the difference between File History on Windows 10 and Time Machine? As far as I can see they both do much the same thing.

I've had less than 30% luck with System Restore and the inability to restore apps and such when moving to a different machine makes it very limited.  Time Machine, and target disk mode are 2 things that have been on the Mac platform forever, and Microsoft & pc makers have done nothing to compete.  Even with the Microsoft Surface product, you can't do a full backup to a disk/share, turn on a new Surface and point it at said share and have it restore the machine as a whole.

When a Mac crashes, worst case I should be able to boot in Target disk mode and connect it to another Mac and have access to all files.  That ability does not exist in the PC world, and is even more critical now with embedded storage, since there is no way to get to it otherwise (use to be we could pull out the 2.5" drive and plug it into another computer).
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Joe Towner

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2018, 10:51:12 PM »

I'm sorry, but the notion that Apple and Windows are any different in this regard is complete nonsense.

Even with Universal Restore from StorageCraft, the PC world does not have a time machine equal, where you can 'backup' a Macbook Air and restore that user, with all their apps, settings and data on a iMac Pro.
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Jonathan Cross

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2018, 05:48:17 AM »

Thanks for the responses.  Just to be clear, is it the case that it is not possible on a Windows machine to back up all settings, apps and data on an external HD and then restore them if the computer needs a full reset and windows reinstalling, whereas you can on a Mac if the equivalent is needed? 

My crash destroyed all the restore points and my backup was just the data.  I am having to reinstall all my programmes from disc or by downloading again.  The real problem is that my e-mail was Windows Live Mail, no longer available.  While I have all the e-mails and email folders backed up and have a contacts folder, I am having difficulty working out how to migrate these into Outlook or Windows Mail, neither of which I know how to use.  My internet provider does have an e-mail system, but I cannot import my contacts and it does not have a record of e-mails sent for Live Mail. 

Life seems to have been simpler with pencil, paper, snail mail and Fuji Velvia.
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Jonathan in UK

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2018, 09:03:31 AM »

With a good imaging program, like Acronis, you can save periodically exact images of your system drive onto an external drive, restoring your system after a crash from a restoration thumb drive or CD.
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Joe Towner

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2018, 06:57:34 PM »

Just to be clear, is it the case that it is not possible on a Windows machine to back up all settings, apps and data on an external HD and then restore them if the computer needs a full reset and windows reinstalling, whereas you can on a Mac if the equivalent is needed? 

My crash destroyed all the restore points and my backup was just the data.  I am having to reinstall all my programmes from disc or by downloading again.  The real problem is that my e-mail was Windows Live Mail, no longer available.  While I have all the e-mails and email folders backed up and have a contacts folder, I am having difficulty working out how to migrate these into Outlook or Windows Mail, neither of which I know how to use.  My internet provider does have an e-mail system, but I cannot import my contacts and it does not have a record of e-mails sent for Live Mail. 

Happy World Backup Day!!  3/31   http://www.worldbackupday.com/

An Acronis TrueImage or StorageCraft ShadowProtect based backup allows for continuous incremental backups (up to every 5 minutes) that are consolidated on a daily basis.  If you were to do a full restore on the same hardware (well, excluding the hard drive - you most likely will want to put in a new HD or better a SSD), it'll work fine, and would be 'everything' inclusive of programs and installs.  Yes, the install is boot off usb/cd, connect to the backup drive, point it at the new internal drive and hit go.

There are other software packages, but I can speak to these two. 
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Farmer

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2018, 09:34:50 PM »

Even with Universal Restore from StorageCraft, the PC world does not have a time machine equal, where you can 'backup' a Macbook Air and restore that user, with all their apps, settings and data on a iMac Pro.

Yes, you can.  You may have licensing issues with some apps, but Windows happily reinstalls on any hardware - it may require a few updates if there are significant changes in the hardware.  The only advantage Apple has is the limited hardware iterations mean they cater for all of them with every build, but as far as constant backups and reinstallation on the same or different hardware, there's no issue beyond licencing which may object to you having some apps working on more than one piece of hardware.
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Phil Brown

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Re: Windows crash
« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2018, 09:37:05 PM »

Happy World Backup Day!!  3/31   http://www.worldbackupday.com/

An Acronis TrueImage or StorageCraft ShadowProtect based backup allows for continuous incremental backups (up to every 5 minutes) that are consolidated on a daily basis.  If you were to do a full restore on the same hardware (well, excluding the hard drive - you most likely will want to put in a new HD or better a SSD), it'll work fine, and would be 'everything' inclusive of programs and installs.  Yes, the install is boot off usb/cd, connect to the backup drive, point it at the new internal drive and hit go.

There are other software packages, but I can speak to these two.

It doesn't have to be the same hardware - not since Win 7.  I've done it as a migration tool - create a backup, put it on a new machine, let it run some updates.  Works fine.  I typically don't do it because I review my system and prefer clean installations, but it works just fine.

You can also save it as a virtual disk and just boot to that instead of the main Windows installation, or use a virtual machine to run that installation as well as the primary on a device.  So many options.
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Phil Brown
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